Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the ASCII number for the double quote? (")

Also, is there a link to a list anywhere?

Finally, how do you enter it in the C family (esp. C#)

share|improve this question
2  
asciitable.com –  adrianbanks Jan 25 '10 at 19:10
2  
As for your last question, "\"" usually does the trick. –  Pascal Cuoq Jan 25 '10 at 19:11
1  
const char DblQuote = @'"'; string s = "hello " + DblQuote + "\" world"; That is in C#. –  t0mm13b Jan 25 '10 at 19:21
1  
Whoever voted the question down please explain. –  Arlen Beiler Jan 25 '10 at 20:28
3  
I suppose this is deemed so elemental that it's hard to take the question seriously. ASCII tables aren't particularly hard to find, anyway which answers your two original questions already without too much effort. Generally it's frowned upon if people don't apply their Google-Fu before asking a question. –  Joey Jan 25 '10 at 22:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The ASCII code for the quotation mark is 34.

(Well, strictly speaking it's not a real quotation mark but the inches mark that we commonly use as quotation mark. A real quotation mark is a typographical character that is not available in ASCII.)

There are plenty of ASCII tables on the web. Note that some describe the standard 7-bit ASCII code, while others describe various 8-bit extensions that are super-sets of ASCII.

To put quotation marks in a string, you escape it using a backslash:

string msg = "Let's just call it a \"duck\" and be done with it.";

To put a quotation mark in a character literal, you don't need to escape it:

char quotationMark = '"';

Note: Strings and characters in C# are not ASCII, they are Unicode. As Unicode is a superset of ASCII the codes are still usable though. You would need a Unicode character table to look up some characters, but an ASCII table works fine for the most common characters.

share|improve this answer
    
how do you enter it like this? vara + Char34 + varb + "some string"; –  Arlen Beiler Jan 25 '10 at 19:22
1  
@Arlen: You put it in a string: vara + "\"" + varb + "some string". (You could use a character literal also, but that would be pointless as it will be converted to a string before concatenation anyway.) –  Guffa Jan 25 '10 at 19:25
2  
It's not even the symbol used for inches. That'd be a double prime (U+2033). –  Joey Jan 25 '10 at 19:44

It's 34. And you can find a list on Wikipedia.

share|improve this answer
    
const char DblQuote = @'"'; string s = "hello " + DblQuote + "\" world"; That is in C# –  Arlen Beiler Jan 25 '10 at 19:31
    
Guffa: You put it in a string: vara + "\"" + varb + "some string". (You could use a character literal also, but that would be pointless as it will be converted to a string before concatenation anyway.) –  Arlen Beiler Jan 25 '10 at 21:33

Try Google and you will get tons of ASCII tables.

share|improve this answer

here is another alternative: http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=%22

share|improve this answer
    
What I love about this answer is that while it is an RTFM answer, it also contains the real answer: 0x22. –  Chas. Owens Sep 11 '13 at 18:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.