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For my exam of programming and algorithm design I have to be familiar with time complexity and the Big-Oh notation. I understand most of it, but then I bumped in to this question and the solution I have seems fairly simple; but I don't understand which steps are necessary. Could someone clarify the steps took?

Exercise:

A quadratic algorithm with processing time T(n) = cn^2 spends T(N) seconds for processing N data items. How much time will be spent for processing n = 3000 data items, assuming that N = 100 and T (N) = 1 ms?

Given solution:

The constant factor c = T(N)/(N^2), therefore T(n) = T(N) * (n^2)/(N^2) = n^2/10000 and T (3000) = 900 ms

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closed as off-topic by Dukeling, Karoly Horvath, easwee, bmargulies, nkjt Apr 3 '14 at 11:55

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I'm totally confused with n and N. both are the count of data items but they differ. –  Karoly Horvath Jan 25 '14 at 12:36
    
N and n looks the same thing. I think N is used to represent a particular example. –  Ethan Fang Jan 25 '14 at 12:38
    
really? "How much time will be spent for processing n = 3000 data items, assuming that N = 100" –  Karoly Horvath Jan 25 '14 at 12:46
4  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about a simple maths problem, not a specific programming problem. –  Dukeling Jan 25 '14 at 12:50
    
The exam question is poorly worded. The 'assuming' clause should be clearer, perhaps: assuming that when N = 100, T(N) = 1 ms. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 20 '14 at 16:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a pretty simple maths problem:

If T(n) = cn² and T(100) = 1ms then

T(100) = c * 100²
       = c * 10,000
       = 1ms

Therefore solving for c gives:

c = (1/10,000)ms

This can then be used to calculate T(3000):

T(3000) = (1/10,000)ms * 3,000²
        = (1/10,000)ms * 9,000,000
        = (9,000,000 / 10,000)ms
        = 900ms
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Oh wow, I was just looking the wrong way ... Haha, thanks a lot ! blushy face –  user3235058 Jan 25 '14 at 13:10

This doesn't have anything to do with Big-Oh notation, or even computer science. All you need is basic algebra. Given that T(n) = cn^2 for some c, and T(100) = 0.001, what is T(3000)?

    0.001 = T(100) = c (100*100) = 10000c
    c = 10^-7

    T(3000) = c n^2 = 10^-7 * 3000 * 3000 = 0.9
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It is straight forward. You have N = 100, T(N) = 1. So c = T(N)/N^2 = 1/10000.

Then you do T(3000) = 1/10000 * (3000 ^ 2) = 900.

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