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I have a set of 4 PDEs:

du/dt + A(u) * du/dx = Q(u)

where,u is a matrix and contains:

u=[u1;u2;u3;u4]

and A is a 4*4 matrix. Q is 4*1. A and Q are function of u=[u1;u2;u3;u4].

But my questions are:

  1. How can I solve above equation in MATLAB?
  2. If I solved it by PDE functions of Matlab,can I convert it to a simple function that is not used from ready functions of Matlab?
  3. Is there any way that I calculate A and Q explicitly. I mean that in every time step, I calculate A and Q from data of previous time step and put new value in the equation that causes faster run of program?
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1 Answer

PDEs require finite differences, finite elements, boundary elements, etc. You can also turn them into ODEs using transforms like Laplace, Fourier, etc. Solve those using ODE functions and then transform back. Neither one is trivial.

Your equation is a non-linear transient diffusion equation. It's a parabolic PDE.

The equation you posted has the additional difficulty of being non-linear, because both the A matrix and Q vector are functions of the independent variable q. You'll have to start by linearizing your equations. Solve for increments in u rather than u itself.

Once you've done that, discretize the du/dx term using finite differences, finite elements, or boundary elements. You should start with a weighted residual integral formulation.

You're almost done: Next to integrate w.r.t. time using the method of your choice.

It's not trivial.

Google found this: maybe it will help you.

http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/3710-nonlinear-diffusion-toolbox

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My question is that what function in Matlab can solve set of first order PDE.I did not it in Help of Matlab. –  user2987710 Jan 25 at 16:48
    
PDEs require finite differences, finite elements, boundary elements, etc. You can also turn them into ODEs using transforms like Laplace, Fourier, etc. Solve those using ODE functions and then transform back. Neither one is trivial. –  duffymo Jan 25 at 17:02
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