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I have a function to pop element from a dictionary, if anything goes wrong, an exception should be thrown. The code looks quite okay.

type 
  ENoSuchElementException = class(Exception);
var
  FResults: TDictionary<Cardinal, TObject> = TDictionary<Cardinal, TObject>.Create;
  FLock: TCriticalSection = TCriticalSection.Create;

/// <exceptions cref="ENoSuchElementException">Element does not exist</exceptions>
function Take(Id: Cardinal): TObject;
begin    
  FLock.Acquire;
  try
    try
      Result := FResults[Id]; // here may throw exception
      FResults.Remove(Id);
    except
      on E: Exception do
      begin
        raise ENoSuchElementException.Create(E.ToString);
      end;
    end;
  finally
    FLock.Release;
  end;
end;

But the Delphi XE4 compiler complains about W1035: Return value of function 'Take' might be undefined.

I am suddenly so confused. If an exception is thrown, why the code still expect a return value? Does it mean that try...finally will eat the exception? Can someone point out the problem of my code?

RESOLVED: As David mentioned, the try...except should be moved to outer. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Sigh. Couldn't we have had an SSCCE? Now each of us have to spend time making one. –  David Heffernan Jan 25 '14 at 14:41
    
@David, I've updated the code example, it should be more compact now. –  stanleyxu2005 Jan 25 '14 at 14:44
    
An SSCCE is really what is needed –  David Heffernan Jan 25 '14 at 14:45
    
I'm curious why you want to covert a regular exception into a silent one - if you don't want the usual error box, you can handle that globally. –  Chris Rolliston Jan 25 '14 at 15:23
1  
Yes. The convention in Emba containers is that anything named Extract removes the item from the container. –  David Heffernan Jan 26 '14 at 7:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This appears to be a false positive reported by the 32 bit compiler. The 64 bit compiler does not report a warning for your code. And the 64 bit compiler is correct. Perhaps the 32 bit compiler sees that you are catching the exception and does not go on to detect that you always subsequently raise another exception.

One way to work around the 32 bit compiler's mis-diagnosis is to make the try/except be the outer-most block. Consider the following SSCCE:

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils;

procedure Foo;
begin
end;

function Take1(const Id: Integer): Integer;
begin
  try
    try
      Foo;
      Result := 42;
    except
      on E:Exception do
      begin
        raise Exception.Create(E.ToString);
      end;
    end;
  finally
  end;
end;

function Take2(const Id: Integer): Integer;
begin
  try
    try
      Foo;
      Result := 42;
    finally
    end;
  except
    on E:Exception do
    begin
      raise Exception.Create(E.ToString);
    end;
  end;
end;

begin
end.

The compiler's output is:

[dcc32 Warning] W1035 Return value of function 'Take1' might be undefined

So, Take1 is my simplified version of your code. The 32 bit compiler warns for that. And Take2 swaps the order of the except and finally. And the compiler does not warn.

Perhaps this workaround is not the one for you, but you will have to come up with something of this nature.

The bottom line is that your analysis is correct, and the compiler is wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I have a 64 bit compiler, however the build configuration is 32 bit. I have a self rewritten VCL library, which can never be installed in 64 bit mode. I can only compile it in 64 bit mode. This is the reason why I build my code with a 32 bit compiler. –  stanleyxu2005 Jan 25 '14 at 14:46
    
I am not suggesting that you compiler for 64 bit. I did not write that. –  David Heffernan Jan 25 '14 at 14:47
    
Oh yes. Now I see the problem in my code. I was somehow connected my brain with Java/D etc, as these languages have a different try...catch...finally handling. –  stanleyxu2005 Jan 25 '14 at 14:56
    
There is nothing wrong with your code. It is fine. The compiler is at fault. Anyway, I think having the exception handler outmost is probably cleaner code so that's probably a nice expedient solution. –  David Heffernan Jan 25 '14 at 15:19
    
I will remember the usage and just wondered, after so many years, Delphi still does not merge try/finally and try/except as one try/except/finally. Code try try looks really ridiculous. –  stanleyxu2005 Jan 25 '14 at 18:24

David Heffernan's given you the most direct answer, however an alternative is to avoid the try/except block completely and use the TryGetValue method of TDictionary. Going a bit further, you could if you wanted to also get rid of the separate locking object:

var FResults: TDictionary<Cardinal, TResult>;

function Take(Id: Cardinal): TResult;
begin    
  TMonitor.Enter(FResults);
  try
    if FResults.TryGetValue(Id, Result) then
      FResults.Remove(Id)
    else
      Abort;
  finally
    TMonitor.Exit(FResults);
  end;
end;

TMonitor historically had significant bugs, but it will be OK in XE4.

share|improve this answer
1  
Doesn't the compiler recognise Abort? In other words, do you need to write Result := nil after Abort given that Abort raises. –  David Heffernan Jan 25 '14 at 15:49
    
Yes, your approach works as well. But I want to take the advantage of exceptions. The benefit is that where I call the method, I do not have to check whether the value is null. For me, it will be perfectly clear, a method will return a not null value or an exception. –  stanleyxu2005 Jan 25 '14 at 15:55
    
I give you an example: to get an element from a list, I will usually have two methods: getElement(Condition) and requireElement(Condition). get means, it might return null, but require means it will throw an exception if nothing can be returned. I have a project github.com/stanleyxu2005/dutil, you can checkout the two validation classes, and you will understand . –  stanleyxu2005 Jan 25 '14 at 15:58
1  
Do you think try...except is evil? Although the Delphi IDE does not prompt on unhanded exceptions very well, but I believe using exception is a more modern programming style. –  stanleyxu2005 Jan 25 '14 at 16:02
1  
@DavidHeffernan - I made the original post (no IDE open) without it, then thought 'whoops' and made the edit... only after which I actually tried, and indeed, no hint without it. However, the Abort doesn't prevent the hint - passing the value as a var or out param to another method does (XE3 - I'm in the middle of installing a later version so can't try anything else at the moment). –  Chris Rolliston Jan 25 '14 at 16:13

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