Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Often, when I want a class which is thread-safe, I do something like the following:

public class ThreadSafeClass
{
    private readonly object theLock = new object();

    private double propertyA;
    public double PropertyA
    {
        get
        {
            lock (theLock)
            {
                return propertyA;
            }
        }
        set
        {
            lock (theLock)
            {
                propertyA = value;
            }
        }
    }

    private double propertyB;
    public double PropertyB
    {
        get
        {
            lock (theLock)
            {
                return propertyB;
            }
        }
        set
        {
            lock (theLock)
            {
                propertyB = value;
            }
        }
    }

    public void SomeMethod()
    {
        lock (theLock)
        {
            PropertyA = 2.0 * PropertyB;
        }
    }
}

It works, but it is very verbose. Sometimes I even create a lock object for each method and property creating more verbosity and complexity.

I know that it is also possible to lock classes using the Synchronization attribute but I'm not sure how well that scales -- as I often expect to have hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of instances of thread-safe objects. This approach would create a synchronization context for every instance of the class, and requires the class to be derived from ContextBoundObject and therefore could not be derived from anything else -- since C# doesn't allow for multiple inheritance -- which is a show stopper in many cases.

Edit: As several of the responders have emphasized, there is no "silver bullet" thread-safe class design. I'm just trying to understand if the pattern I'm using is one of the good solutions. Of course the best solution in any particular situation is problem dependent. Several of the answers below contain alternative designs which should be considered.

Edit: Moreover, there is more than one definition of thread safety. For example, in my implementation above, the following code would NOT be thread-safe:

var myObject = new ThreadSafeClass();
myObject.PropertyA++; // NOT thread-safe

So, does the class definition above represent a good approach? If not, what would you recommend for a design with similar behavior which would be thread-safe for a similar set of uses?

share|improve this question
4  
Please search first: stackoverflow.com/… –  John Saunders Jan 25 '10 at 20:06
    
Hm. In your code, you use the same lock object for reading both PropertyA and PropertyB. That means one thread reading PropertyA will lock out another trying to read PropertyB until the first thread is complete. Is that what you want? If this were my class, I'd create a separate read locker for each getter and then the setters must also respect that lock. See an answer below. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jan 25 '10 at 20:44
    
I just downvoted you because there is no single way to produce a thread-safe class. Any answer to this question risks giving the wrong impression to future readers. –  John Saunders Jan 26 '10 at 1:06
    
John, I agree with you and have edited my question above following your comment. –  Joe H Jan 26 '10 at 3:17
    
My point was not that there is more than one solution - my point is that there is more than one definition of thread-safe. Your question suggests there is only one. –  John Saunders Jan 26 '10 at 4:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There is no "one-size-fits-all" solution to the multi-threading problem. Do some research on creating immutable classes and learn about the different synchronization primitives.

This is an example of a semi-immutable or the-programmers-immutable class .

public class ThreadSafeClass
{
    public double A { get; private set; }
    public double B { get; private set; }
    public double C { get; private set; }

    public ThreadSafeClass(double a, double b, double c)
    {
        A = a;
        B = b;
        C = c;
    }

    public ThreadSafeClass RecalculateA()
    {
        return new ThreadSafeClass(2.0 * B, B, C);
    }
}

This example moves your synchronization code into another class and serializes access to an instance. In reality, you don't really want more than one thread operating on an object at any given time.

public class ThreadSafeClass
{
    public double PropertyA { get; set; }
    public double PropertyB { get; set; }
    public double PropertyC { get; set; }

    private ThreadSafeClass()
    {

    }

    public void ModifyClass()
    {
        // do stuff
    }

    public class Synchronizer
    {
        private ThreadSafeClass instance = new ThreadSafeClass();
        private readonly object locker = new object();

        public void Execute(Action<ThreadSafeClass> action)
        {
            lock (locker)
            {
                action(instance);
            }
        }

        public T Execute<T>(Func<ThreadSafeClass, T> func)
        {
            lock (locker)
            {
                return func(instance);
            }
        }
    }
}

Here is a quick example of how you would use it. It may seem a little clunky but it allows you to execute many actions on the instance in one go.

var syn = new ThreadSafeClass.Synchronizer();

syn.Execute(inst => { 
    inst.PropertyA = 2.0;
    inst.PropertyB = 2.0;
    inst.PropertyC = 2.0;
});

var a = syn.Execute<double>(inst => {
    return inst.PropertyA + inst.PropertyB;
});
share|improve this answer
    
I understand your approach here -- and I see that in many cases it would be the best one. However, it does not allow A, B, and C to be changed with the property syntax, and will create performance problems if updates are very frequent since each update entails creating a new object and letting the GC handle the old one. –  Joe H Jan 25 '10 at 20:33
    
Well not for a class like this. But for any kind business object you are correct. –  ChaosPandion Jan 25 '10 at 20:36
1  
This is just an example of an immutable class. While it's technically correct to say that it's "thread safe" (in the sense that interactions with multiple simultaneous threads won't cause corruption or misbehavior) it's hardly a model for "this is how all 'thread-safe' classes should be made". –  Adam Robinson Jan 25 '10 at 20:51
1  
There is no "one-size-fits-all" model for thread-safe classes. This and my update are two of many possibilities. –  ChaosPandion Jan 25 '10 at 20:56
1  
+1: immutable classes really are the best general purpose solution to thread-safe classes, especially if you just want to write the class and don't even want to think about whether you've implemented thread safety correctly. –  Juliet Jan 26 '10 at 14:53

Bear in mind that the term "thread safe" is not specific; what you're doing here would be more accurately referred to as "synchronization" through the use of a Monitor lock.

That said, the verbosity around synchronized code is pretty much unavoidable. You could cut down on some of the whitespace in your example by turning things like this:

lock (theLock)
{
    propertyB = value;
}

into this:

lock (theLock) propertyB = value;

As to whether or not this is the right approach for you we really need more information. Synchronization is just one approach to "thread safety"; immutable objects, semaphores, etc. are all different mechanisms that fit different use-cases. For the simple example you provide (where it looks like you're trying to ensure the atomicity of a get or set operation), then it looks like you've done the right things, but if your code is intended to be more of an illustration than an example then things may not be as simple.

share|improve this answer

I know this might sound like an smart a** answer but ... the BEST way to develop threadsafe classes is to actually know about multithreading, about its implications, its intricacies and what does it implies. There's no silver bullet.

Seriously... don't try to multithread (in production scenarios I mean) until you know what you're getting yourself into... It can be a huge mistake.

Edit: You should of course know the synchronization primitives of both the operating system and your language of choice (C# under Windows in this case, I guess).

I'm sorry I'm not giving just the code to just make a class threadsafe. That's because it does not exist. A completely threadsafe class will probably just be slower than just avoiding threads and will probably act as a bottleneck to whatever you're doing... effectively undoing whatever you thing you're achieving by using threads.

share|improve this answer
    
I know there is no silver bullet. I have lots of production code using the pattern I described above -- and I agree with you that multi-threading should not be taken lightly. However, my application is robust and does not (currently) suffer from any deadlocks or race conditions -- although it has in the past. I'm not saying this pattern or variations on it are the answer to all multi-threading problem. I'm just asking if there is a more elegant way to get the behavior that the above code has. It never seemed ideal to me and I am trying to draw on the intelligence of the community. –  Joe H Jan 26 '10 at 3:32
5  
I have to say that's pretty bad advice. It is like saying that one should become a master craftsman before every picking up a saw. You have to start somewhere, and this isn't a bad place. –  Jonathan Allen Jan 26 '10 at 3:36
    
I have to agree with Jonathan on this. –  ChaosPandion Jan 26 '10 at 4:02

Since no else seems to be doing it, here is some analysis on your specific design.

  • Want to read any single property? Threadsafe
  • Want to update to any single property? Threadsafe
  • Want to read a single property and then update it based on its original value? Not Threadsafe

Thread 2 could update the value between thread 1's read and update.

  • Want to update two related properties at the same time? Not Threadsafe

You could end up with Property A having thread 1's value and Property B having thread 2's value.

  1. Thread 1 Update A
  2. Thread 2 Update A
  3. Thread 1 Update B
  4. Thread 2 Update B

    • Want to read two related properties at the same time? Not Threadsafe

Again, you could be interrupted between the first and second read.

I could continue, but you get the idea. Threadsafety is purely based on how you plan to access the objects and what promises you need to make.

share|improve this answer

You may find the Interlocked class helpful. It contains several atomic operations.

share|improve this answer

One thing you could do that could help you avoid the extra code is use something like PostSharp to automatically inject those lock statements into your code, even if you had hundreds of them. All you'd need is one attribute attached to the class, and the attribute's implementation which would add the extra locking variables.

share|improve this answer

As per my comment above - it gets a little hairier if you want simultaneous readers allowed but only one writer allowed. Note, if you have .NET 3.5, use ReaderWriterLockSlim rather than ReaderWriterLock for this type of pattern.

public class ThreadSafeClass
{
    private readonly ReaderWriterLock theLock = new ReaderWriterLock();

    private double propertyA;
    public double PropertyA
    {
        get
        {
            theLock.AcquireReaderLock(Timeout.Infinite);
            try
            {
                return propertyA;
            }
            finally
            {
                theLock.ReleaseReaderLock();
            }
        }
        set
        {
            theLock.AcquireWriterLock(Timeout.Infinite);
            try
            {
                propertyA = value;
            }
            finally
            {
                theLock.ReleaseWriterLock();
            }
        }
    }

    private double propertyB;
    public double PropertyB
    {
        get
        {
            theLock.AcquireReaderLock(Timeout.Infinite);
            try
            {
                return propertyB;
            }
            finally
            {
                theLock.ReleaseReaderLock();
            }
        }
        set
        {
            theLock.AcquireWriterLock(Timeout.Infinite);
            try
            {
                propertyB = value;
            }
            finally
            {
                theLock.ReleaseWriterLock();
            }
        }
    }

    public void SomeMethod()
    {
        theLock.AcquireWriterLock(Timeout.Infinite);
        try
        {
            theLock.AcquireReaderLock(Timeout.Infinite);
            try
            {
                PropertyA = 2.0 * PropertyB;
            }
            finally
            {
                theLock.ReleaseReaderLock();
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            theLock.ReleaseWriterLock();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if you had 10 properties instead of two?! –  Joe H Jan 25 '10 at 20:52
4  
Know your tools, the framework has ReaderWriterLockSlim to perform this kind of lock: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Chris Pitman Jan 25 '10 at 20:59
    
This is precisely why I asked if you wanted to have properties fully sync'd together or not. It's all based on your needs. You trade flexibility for complexity. Chris' suggestion of ReaderWriterLockSlim (or ReaderWriterLock if you want the HEAVYWEIGHT version) will work to serialize the writers. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jan 25 '10 at 21:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.