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I am in the process of learning Objective C. Some rather different syntax; I don't see why they had to re-invent things, darn them.

I think I have this straight. An instance method is one where you have to create an instance of a class to use the methods. Proceeded by a minus sign. A class method is one where you DO NOT have to create a class instance. Proceeded by a plus sign.

So would it be appropriate to write a class that you don't intend to instantiate with methods that you can use where ever? Sort of like a general group of tool for your program? So long as I keep with the MVC methodology.

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Fun fact; Java -- and all derivations therein -- was quite directly inspired by Objective-C, lifting many design patterns quite directly. –  bbum Jan 25 at 17:42
    
If you're going to create a class that consists only of class methods and no instance methods (and therefore shouldn't be instantiated), I'd recommend marking the alloc, init, and initWithZone: methods with __attribute__((unavailable("This class can not be instantiated"))); –  nhgrif Jan 25 at 19:20
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The syntax is different because, unlike C++, all valid C code is also valid Objective-C, and the same code does the same thing in Objective-C as it does in C. To make this possible, the syntax additions - class declarations, method declarations, method invocations, etc - had to be qualified in some way so that they would not conflict with the existing C grammar. Hence all the @s, +s, -s, []s, etc. C++, by contrast, is in many ways a completely different language from C, in spite of the name and superficially similar syntax. "C-like syntax" does not mean "C-like language". –  user2310967 Jan 25 at 19:46

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I am in the process of learning Objective C. Some rather different syntax; I don't see why they had to re-invent things, darn them.

Keep in mind that Objective-C was originally created in 1983, the same year as C++. So, it's not really a reinvention, at least of the languages you're likely used to. In fact it probably predates many of said languages. Objective-C is heavily inspired by Smalltalk, but I think you'd find Smalltalk syntax even more unfamiliar!

An instance method is one where you have to create an instance of a class to use the methods. Proceeded by a minus sign. A class method is one where you DO NOT have to create a class instance. Proceeded by a plus sign.

Yes, you essentially have that straight. Class methods, whose declaration/definition begins with a '+', can be called on a class itself instead of an instance of a class. In Objective-C, classes are themselves objects. Class methods can't access instance variables (because they're not called on an instance), but otherwise, they're regular methods. Instance methods may only be called on an instantiated instance of a class, and have access to that instance's internal state (ie. its instance variables).

So would it be appropriate to write a class that you don't intend to instantiate with methods that you can use where ever?

Sure, this is not unreasonable. Whether it's a great idea or not is another question. I think many times it's more appropriate to use regular functions rather than class methods for this sort of thing. Class methods are typically used for convenience methods (like factory methods), to configure global/default behavior of all instances of that class, and that sort of thing.

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