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When creating test cases for setters and getters of instance variables within the object. What is the best approach? Here I use the get and set methods within my tests. Would this be poor testing strategy?

/**
 * Test of setFlightNumber method, of class Flight.
 */
@Test
public void testSetFlightNumber() {
    System.out.println("setFlightNumber");
    int flightNumber = 1000;
    Flight instance = new Flight();
    instance.setFlightNumber(flightNumber);
    // TODO review the generated test code and remove the default call to fail.
    assertEquals(instance.getFlightNumber(), flightNumber);
}

/**
 * Test of getFlightNumber method, of class Flight.
 */
@Test
public void testGetFlightNumber() {
    System.out.println("getFlightNumber");
    Flight instance = new Flight();
    int expResult = 1000;
    instance.setFlightNumber(1000);
    int result = instance.getFlightNumber();
    assertEquals(expResult, result);
}
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4  
Why are you bothering to test setters and getters? That'd be my first question; unless your setters/getters are doing more than what they say they are (which is bad anyway), then you should rely on the fact that the assignment to a field won't fail. Also, you're ironically testing that they work in the same method, so if you were going to test this, you'd only need one method (since, without reflection, you wouldn't have a way to get back the value that was set without getting it). – Makoto Jan 25 '14 at 18:15
    
Its a requirement for a lab. I have just been reading and many suggest that it is pointless. But lets just say one was required to test it just for the sake of testing. Would it be okay to use the getFlightNumber method within the setFlightNumber? – user3126529 Jan 25 '14 at 19:28

The main principle of unit testing is that you test a simple unit of code; that is, each method should be tested on its own merits.

This means we can't use the get method in our set test, and vice versa - you're not testing the individual unit of code that is the single method.

Given that...

Let's say we have a PlainOldJavaObject with a field value that we want (for some reason) to test the validity of setters and getters for. The only appropriate way to do this is through the use of reflection.

Here's my class declaration, which is pretty skinny:

public class PlainOldJavaObject {

    private String value;

    public String getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public void setValue(String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
}

I now set up my test class to make use of reflection; specifically using the Field class:

public class PlainOldJavaObjectTest {

    @Test
    public void testSetter_setsProperly() throws NoSuchFieldException, IllegalAccessException {
        //given
        final PlainOldJavaObject pojo = new PlainOldJavaObject();

        //when
        pojo.setValue("foo");

        //then
        final Field field = pojo.getClass().getDeclaredField("value");
        field.setAccessible(true);
        assertEquals("Fields didn't match", field.get(pojo), "foo");
    }

    @Test
    public void testGetter_getsValue() throws NoSuchFieldException, IllegalAccessException {
        //given
        final PlainOldJavaObject pojo = new PlainOldJavaObject();
        final Field field = pojo.getClass().getDeclaredField("value");
        field.setAccessible(true);
        field.set(pojo, "magic_values");

        //when
        final String result = pojo.getValue();

        //then
        assertEquals("field wasn't retrieved properly", result, "magic_values");
    }

}

In the first test, I am making certain that the field is read by reflectively accessing the value contained in the field for the instance of PlainOldJavaObject. Without violating the integrity of the declared class*, I am confident that the field is being set appropriately.

In the second test, I assume that the value has already been set to something prior, so the set-up involves populating the field with a known default value. When I read the value back, I am asserting that the value read back is the value that we know it was originally set to.

Ultimately, if you have a lot of setters and getters, you'll have to do code like this (since, if you rely on the assumption that your setters and getters "just work", like you are in your tests above, your test cases may be invalid).

*: Mind you, reflection is a quick and fast way to get into extreme trouble with undefined behavior, and you have few guarantees of object immutability. You're taking the shrink wrap off of the language and are doing strange and unusual things. Proceed at your own peril.

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@MariuszS: That uses getters. – Martin Schröder Jan 27 '14 at 13:14
    
Personally I feel the use of getters for testing a setter is more appropriate than using refection. I feel that reflection can lead to brittle tests and the coder should be able to refactor code without updating the test if the API does not change. I believe unit tests should test a portion of the API contract not the underlying code. The contract of a setter is that when called the getter returns the passed value. The underlying code could use an AtomicReference, Optional or any other holder and still meet the contract. – John B Jan 27 '14 at 17:10

I believe that getter / setter testing does have value in that it could catch typo errors. However very little time should be spent on them since these errors are not frequent due to code generation tools. Hence using a tool to execute these test rather than writing them yourself is good practice.

This is why I created a ReflectiveGetterSetterTester which has a method testAllGetterSetters

ReflectiveGetterSetterTester

Couple other notes...

  • There is no need to use two test methods. Use one since it will exersize both the getter and setter.
  • Consider using a Theory to test a range of valid values (0, 1, Integer.MAX_VALUE). You might also use TestedOn to pass those int in-line example here
  • Test error conditions like passing -1
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