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What must I do in order to be able to return an Iterator from a method/class ? How would one add that trait to a class?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can extend Iterator, which will require that you implement the next and hasNext methods:

  class MyAnswer extends Iterator[Int] {
    def hasNext = true
    def next = 42
  }

But, you will get more flexibility if you extend Iterable, which requires you implement elements (or iterator in 2.8):

  class MyAnswer extends Iterable[Int] {
    def iterator = new Iterator[Int] {
      def hasNext = true
      def next = 42
    }
  }

A common idiom seems to be to expose an iterator to some private collection, like this:

  class MyStooges extends Iterable[String] {
    private val stooges = List("Moe", "Larry", "Curly")
    def iterator = stooges.iterator
  }
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There is't a way to send private messages but I'd like to pose a question: could you perhaps point me to a usage of the common idiom you mention? If not, what could it be useful for? Why not just return the List? Wouldn't this idiom be less efficient? (Also: I've seen that Iterable[A] "trick" a few times and it seems to be one of the fastest ways to create something collection-like, are there any "alternatives" to this approach? I aks because Iterator gives little information so the methods can't be optimized well, what if I knew that my pseudo coll returns ordered or has fast random acces) –  Aktau Feb 21 '12 at 10:45

For a method, just yield:

def odd(from: Int, to: Int): List[Int] = 
  for (i <- List.range(from, to) if i % 2 == 1) yield i
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