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What are some alternatives to inheritance?

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9  
"Composition" is a start. –  Anon. Jan 25 '10 at 21:14
1  
What are you trying to do? And what are your limitations? –  Michael Krauklis Jan 25 '10 at 21:16
2  
@Michael Krauklis - this is theoretical question –  Registered User Jan 25 '10 at 21:19
    
Smells like homework. –  S.Lott Jan 25 '10 at 21:29
    
@S.Lott - no is not. Unfortunately. –  Registered User Jan 25 '10 at 21:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Effective Java: Favor composition over inheritance. (This actually comes from Gang of Four, as well).

The case he makes is that inheritance can cause a lot of unseemly side effects, if the extended class was not explicitly designed to be inherited. For example, any calls to super.someMethod() can lead you through unexpected paths of unknown code.

Instead, hold a reference to the class you would have otherwise extended, and delegate to it.

Here is a link to an interview with Erich Gamma where he talks about the concept a bit.

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2  
I suspect you've misquoted that. –  Anon. Jan 25 '10 at 21:20
2  
@ Anon - i.e. ??? –  Registered User Jan 25 '10 at 21:21
2  
The original post misquoted as "Favor Inheritance over Composition", rather than the other way around. It's been corrected now. –  Anon. Jan 25 '10 at 21:23

Some alternatives:

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Your link is to function composition, which is not so useful as an alternative to inheritance in Java. Also, I am not sure how you intend to differentiate delegation and composition. –  danben Jan 25 '10 at 23:28
    
@danben: Good call, I have updated my answer. –  Paul Wagland Jan 26 '10 at 8:39

I'm assuming you're playing with Java which has some rules about inheritance.

Implementing interfaces is a common and oft used option. So, for example, if you have a data-source class that talks to a RDBMS, rather than inheriting that class and using it to implement a NoSQL datasource, the both can implement the same interface.

Rather than..

public class RDBMSDataSource {

  ...

  public String loadSomeDataFromDataSource() {
    ...Do some stuff...
  }
}

public class NoSQLDataSource extends RDBMSDataSource {

   ...

   @Override
   public String loadSomeDataFromDataSource() {
      ...Do some other stuff...
   }
}

public class DataSourceClient {

   public void foo() {
      RDBMSDataSource ds = new NoSQLDataSource();
      ds.loadSomeDataFromDataSource();
   }
}

Which works but is hard to read, you could use this...

public interface DataSource {
   public String loadSomeDataFromDataSource();
}

public class RDBMSDataSource implements DataSource {

  ...

  public String loadSomeDataFromDataSource() {
    ...Do some stuff...
  }
}

public class NoSQLDataSource implements DataSource {

   ...

   @Override
   public String loadSomeDataFromDataSource() {
      ...Do some other stuff...
   }
}

public class DataSourceClient {

   public void foo() {
      DataSource ds = new NoSQLDataSource();
      ds.loadSomeDataFromDataSource();
   }
}

Another option would be composition. Say you have employees and customers. Your two options would be...

public class Person {

   protected String name;
   protected String address;
   ...More stuff...
}

public class Employee extends Person {

   protected String jobCode;
   protected String department;
   ...More stuff...
}

public class Customer extends Person {

   protected String salesPerson;
   protected Date registrationDate;
   ...More stuff...
}

...or...

public class ContactInfo {
   private String name;
   private String address;
   ...More stuff...
}

public class Employee {

   private ContactInfo contactInfo;
   private String jobCode;
   private String department;
   ...More stuff...
}

public class Customer {

   private ContactInfo contactInfo;
   private String salesPerson;
   private Date registrationDate;
   ...More stuff...
}

Since Java does not have multiple inheritance and you can implement multiple interfaces, you sometimes need to do the above to make sure your development is clean and readable.

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I realise this is not Java per se, but Scala (a language running on the Java Virtual Machine) permits mixins (known as traits in Scala).

Mixins allow you to slot some functionality alongside an existing class, rather than within the inheritance tree.

When a class includes a mixin, the class implements the interface and includes, rather than inherits, all the mixin's attributes and methods. They become part of the class during compilation

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Delegation is an alternative to inheritance.

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This really didn't add anything to the answers already posted. –  DJClayworth Apr 16 '10 at 17:43

I think you should try delegation, delegation is an alternative to inheritance. Delegation means that you include an instance of another class as an instance variable. and it plays a beneficial role that it doesn't force you to accept all the methods of the super class.

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