Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need a method that makes a list from a string like following:

"( * 1 2 ( - 4 3 ) )" -> ["*", 1, 2, ["-", 4, 3]] 

Is there any simple way to handle this problem?

share|improve this question
2  
Writing a Lisp interpreter? –  user2357112 Jan 25 '14 at 23:52
    
Recursive descent parser. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 26 '14 at 0:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no simple built-in to call or one-liner trick you can use, but it's still entirely manageable.

First, you'll want to tokenize the input. Roughly speaking, that means separating it into units like (, *, and 123. If your input is guaranteed to be space-separated, you can just use the split method, but if you need to handle input like (* (+ 1 2) 3), it could be a bit harder.

>>> "( * 1 2 ( - 4 3 ) )".split()
['(', '*', '1', '2', '(', '-', '4', '3', ')', ')']

Now that you have a sequence of tokens, we can write a recursive parser. Go over the tokens one at a time.

  • If you see a number, call int or float on it and return the result.
  • If you see something that isn't a number or a parenthesis, just return it as a string.
  • If you see an opening parenthesis, recursively parse objects from the token sequence and add them to a list until you see a closing parenthesis. Return the list.
share|improve this answer

Some thing like this:

a = " ( * 1 2 ( - 4 35 ) ( + 100 ( / 1 2 ) ) ( + 100 200 ) )"

def p(s):
    r = []
    for x in s:
        if x == "(":
            r.append( p(s) )
        elif x == ")":
            return r
        else:
            r.append(x)
    return r

p(iter(a.split()))

the output is:

Out[23]:

[['*',
  '1',
  '2',
  ['-', '4', '35'],
  ['+', '100', ['/', '1', '2']],
  ['+', '100', '200']]]

You need add some code to convert string to number.

share|improve this answer

use pyparsing, like:

from pyparsing import *

enclosed = Forward()
nestedParens = nestedExpr('(', ')', content=enclosed) 
integer = Word( nums ) # simple unsigned integer
arithOp = Word( "+-*/", max=1 ) # arithmetic operators
enclosed << ( nestedParens | arithOp | integer )

data = '( * 1 2 ( - 4 3 ) )' 

print enclosed.parseString(data).asList()

output:

$ python parse.py 
[['*', '1', '2', ['-', '4', '3']]]
share|improve this answer
    
It is not necessary to use a Forward to show that nestedExpr might include like nestedExpr's - that's why it's named nestedExpr. :) All that is needed is just expr = nestedExpr('(',')', content=integer|arithOp) and then use expr.parseString(data) on the original string. Otherwise, nice answer, thanks for mentioning pyparsing! –  Paul McGuire Dec 31 '14 at 16:33
    
Also, the OP had asked about doing on-the-fly conversion of ints or floats. Pyparsing allows you to define parse actions that will do this kind of conversion at parse time. integer = Word(nums).setParseAction(lambda tokens: int(tokens[0])) will do this, similar for float. –  Paul McGuire Dec 31 '14 at 16:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.