Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following code:

enum A : unsigned { a = 1, b = 2, c = 4 };

class B
{
  friend constexpr A operator|(A a1, A a2)
  { return A(unsigned(a1) | unsigned(a2)); }
};

template <A a>
class C
{
};

int main()
{
  C<a|c> c;
}

When compiled with g++ (4.8.1, -std=c++1), I get the following error:

test.C: In function ‘int main()’:
test.C:16:12: error: invalid conversion from ‘unsigned int’ to ‘A’ [-fpermissive]
       C<a|c> c;

Which tells me that the operator is not being found. However, if the code is changed to:

enum A : unsigned { a = 1, b = 2, c = 4 };

constexpr A operator|(A a1, A a2)
{ return A(unsigned(a1) | unsigned(a2)); }

template <A a>
class C
{
};

int main()
{
  C<a|c> c;
}

Then it compiles and runs fine. Is the error in the first case a compiler error, or I do misunderstand something? I would like to use the method of Boost.Operators to easily define operators by declaring a class with base classes from templates which define the operators, but this result precludes that in this case.

Thanks for any help.

share|improve this question
    
(pure) Argument-dependent lookup (aka Koenig lookup) is dependent on the argument expressions, not on the context of the call. Would you expect auto x = a|c; to find the operator declared inside B? –  dyp Jan 26 at 1:59
    
You might want to explain what you want to do for those of us unfamiliar with Boost.Operators –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 26 at 3:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Another way to solve it (other than jogojapan already mentioned), is to simply declare the friend function outside the scope.

enum A : unsigned { a = 1, b = 2, c = 4 };

//declaration
constexpr A operator|(A a1, A a2);


class B
{
  //definition inside, ok.
  friend constexpr A operator|(A a1, A a2)
  { return A(unsigned(a1) | unsigned(a2)); }
};

template <A a>
class C
{
};

int main()
{
  C<a|c> c;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is correct. The problem is not with the lexical scope, but with the fact that a friend function defined inside the class is not visible outside of the class unless/until a declaration for that function is also provided at namespace level. +1 –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 26 at 3:43
    
You're correct, but this way, there is not really a benefit any more to having the definitions of these functions inside a class. –  hvd Jan 26 at 8:19
    
Yes, I was trying to have something like: template <typename T> class BitwiseEnum { friend constexpr T operator|(T, T) { ... }; friend constexpr T operator&(T) { ...} friend constexpr T operator~(T) { ...} }; which could then be used to "define" this set of operators for any Enum later with out rewriting the definitions constantly. Something like Enum A { ... }; class AWrapper : BitwiseEnum<A> {}; Unfortunately, class AWrapper : BitwiseEnum<AWrapper::A> { Enum A { ... }; }; typedef AWrapper::A A; won't work either. –  BryFry Jan 26 at 14:58

Okay, I took another approach, and here's code which solves my problem:

template <typename UNSIGNED>
struct BitwiseEnum
{
  enum class Enum : UNSIGNED
  {
  };

  constexpr static Enum value(unsigned bit)
  {
    return Enum(UNSIGNED(1) << bit);
  }

  friend constexpr Enum operator|(Enum a, Enum b)
  {
    return Enum(UNSIGNED(a)|UNSIGNED(b));
  }

  friend constexpr Enum operator&(Enum a, Enum b)
  {
    return Enum(UNSIGNED(a)&UNSIGNED(b));
  }

  friend constexpr Enum operator~(Enum a)
  {
    return Enum(~UNSIGNED(a));
  }
};

class MyMask : public BitwiseEnum<unsigned long>
{
};

typedef MyMask::Enum Mask;

constexpr static Mask a = MyMask::value(0);
constexpr static Mask b = MyMask::value(1);
constexpr static Mask c = MyMask::value(2);
constexpr static Mask d = MyMask::value(3);


template <Mask A>
class B
{
};

int main()
{
  B<a|b> test;
}

Now, when I defined a lot of enums like "MyMask", it can be done fairly simply, without much more code than a simply defined enum would have. And it behaves as one would "expect" from a bit field enum, can be used in strongly type checked template arguments, etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.