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I designed a java application. A friend suggested using multi-threading, he claims that running my application as several threads will decrease the run time significantly.

In my main class, I carry several operations that are out of our scope to fill global static variables and hash maps to be used across the whole life time of the process. Then I run the core of the application on the entries of an array list.

        for(int customerID : customers){
        ConsumerPrinter consumerPrinter = new ConsumerPrinter();
        consumerPrinter.runPE(docsPath,outputPath,customerID);
        System.out.println("Customer with CustomerID:"+customerID+" Done");
    }

for each iteration of this loop XMLs of the given customer is fetched from the machine, parsed and calculations are taken on the parsed data. Later, processed results are written in a text file (Fetched and written data can reach up to several Giga bytes at most and 50 MBs on average). More than one iteration can write on the same file.

Should I make this piece of code multi-threaded so each group of customers are taken in an independent thread?

How can I know the most optimal number of threads to run?

What are the best practices to take into consideration when implementing multi-threading?

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3 Answers 3

Should I make this piece of code multi-threaded so each group of customers are taken
in an independent thread?

Yes multi-threading will save your processing time. While iterating on your list you can spawn new thread each iteration and do customer processing in it. But you need to do proper synchronization meaning if two customers processing requires operation on same resource you must synchronize that operation to avoid possible race condition or memory inconsistency issues.

How can I know the most optimal number of threads to run?

You cannot really without actually analyzing the processing time for n customers with different number of threads. It will depend on number of cores your processor has, and what is the actually processing that is taking place for each customer.

What are the best practices to take into consideration when implementing multi-threading?

First and foremost criteria is you must have multiple cores and your OS must support multi-threading. Almost every system does that in present times but is a good criteria to look into. Secondly you must analyze all the possible scenarios that may led to race condition. All the resource that you know will be shared among multiple threads must be thread-safe. Also you must also look out for possible chances of memory inconsistency issues(declare your variable as volatile). Finally there are something that you cannot predict or analyze until you actually run test cases like deadlocks(Need to analyze Thread dump) or memory leaks(Need to analyze Heap dump).

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The idea of multi thread is to make some heavy process into another, lets say..., "block of memory".

Any UI updates have to be done on the main/default thread, like print messenges or inflate a view for example. You can ask the app to draw a bitmap, donwload images from the internet or a heavy validation/loop block to run them on a separate thread, imagine that you are creating a second short life app to handle those tasks for you.

Remember, you can ask the app to download/draw a image on another thread, but you have to print this image on the screen on the main thread.

This is common used to load a large bitmap on a separated thread, make math calculations to resize this large image and then, on the main thread, inflate/print/paint/show the smaller version of that image to te user.

In your case, I don't know how heavy runPE() method is, I don't know what it does, you could try to create another thread for him, but the rest should be on the main thread, it is the main process of your UI.

You could optmize your loop by placing the "ConsumerPrinter consumerPrinter = new ConsumerPrinter();" before the "for(...)", since it does not change dinamically, you can remove it inside the loop to avoid the creating of the same object each time the loop restarts : )

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While straight java multi-threading can be used (java.util.concurrent) as other answers have discussed, consider also alternate programming approaches to multi-threading, such as the actor model. The actor model still uses threads underneath, but much complexity is handled by the actor framework rather than directly by you the programmer. In addition, there is less (or no) need to reason about synchronizing on shared state between threads because of the way programs using the actor model are created.

See Which Actor model library/framework for Java? for a discussion of popular actor model libraries.

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