Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to level-up in JavaScript (I'm not using it much at work), and have pretty well wrapped my head around Constructor functions and how to instantiate new Objects that inherit properties from them.

But usually to really learn something, I need to use it in a real project I'm working on and see it in action.

Problem is, everything I'm reading uses examples like these to explain inheritance:

function Apple (type) {
    this.type = type;
    this.color = "red";
    this.getInfo = getAppleInfo;
}

or

function Car( model, year, miles ) {

  this.model = model;
  this.year = year;
  this.miles = miles;

  this.toString = function () {
    return this.model + " has done " + this.miles + " miles";
  };
}

or

function makeBaby(parent, name) {

  var baby = Object.create(parent);

  baby.name = name;

  return baby;
}

As you might imagine, these sorts of examples (Fruit, Cars, and Parents) are definitely helpful for the purposes of learning concepts, but not really in putting them into practice.

Does anyone have an example of how prototypal inheritance might work in a production-level web application?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Doorknob, Bergi, midhunhk, Ed Bayiates, simoco Mar 8 '14 at 11:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    

2 Answers 2

Prototypal inheritance is useful anywhere you want to use Object Oriented approach with inheritance to model your problems.

One good example is how Backbone.js provides base classes such as Model, Collection and View. In your application you extend those base classes to do something specific, for example

var ProfileSummary = Backbone.View.extend({
  render: function () {
    this.$el.html("Profile summary view");
  }
});

Now ProfileSummary is a class that has (inherits) all of the Backbone.View methods and functionality, but you tweak what the render function does.

Note that the extend method is Backbone's way of providing you with any easy way to extend these classes using the prototypal inheritance - see the code for more details https://github.com/jashkenas/backbone/blob/e6f8f7ea69370b0891cc969a2c68ebb78ad6e49b/backbone.js#L1551-L1588

You can create several layers in your class hierarchy if that helps your application. For example.

var MyBaseView = Backbone.View.extend({
  //common functionality in all views within yur app
});

var ProfileSummary = MyBaseView.extend({
   //functionality specific to the profile summary view
});

var ProfileSummaryEditor = ProfileSummary.extend({
  //makes the profile summary editable
});

Hope this helps. Let me know if I misinterpreted your question.

share|improve this answer
    
This is really interesting. I'd never thought of extend as useful in prototypical inheritance. I'd really only used it to merge config objects, but now that you're talking about it in terms of PI, it's obvious how connected the two are. Also, I really appreciate you centering this on backbone. Exactly the kind of 'real world' example I was looking for. We don't use backbone at work, but what you've said actually sheds light for me on the MVVM we're using. Thanks so much for taking the time to answer. –  Bryce Johnson Feb 20 '14 at 17:04
    
Beware though that the _.extend for merging objects and Backbone's prototypal extend are different. The former simply copies fields from one object to another, but the later deals with prototypes and constructors and stuff. They are related, in fact, one is using the other, but not exactly the same thing. –  Karolis Feb 21 '14 at 9:55
    
Got it. Thanks :) –  Bryce Johnson Feb 21 '14 at 15:35

It's not just prototypal inheritance, but the use-cases also apply to classical inheritance.

Generally, you want to extend the properties and functionalities of one class to another. A beautiful example of this is a view class. It has a draw method that draws to a screen. A great way to reuse code.

So Instead of you duplicating by hand all of the properties of one class to another, you would simply extend from the base class, and you would have all the functionalities of it, as well as adding your own implementations.

An example code that does not use inheritance:

/**
 * View1
 */
function View1 {
  this.viewId = 'view-1';
  this.template = '<some html here>'
}

View1.prototype.draw = function () {
  var ourView = document.getElementById(this.viewId);

  // ps. I know this is redundant, but it's here for illustration purposes.
  var newElement = document.createElement('div');
  ourView.appendChild(newElement);

  ourView.innerHTML = this.template;
}


/**
 * View2
 */
function View2 {
  this.viewId = 'view-2';
  this.template = '<some html here>'
}

View2.prototype.draw = function () {
  var ourView = document.getElementById(this.id);

  // ps. I know this is redundant, but it's here for illustration purposes.
  var newElement = document.createElement('div');
  ourView.appendChild(newElement);

  ourView.innerHTML = this.template;
}

As you can see above, there are a lot of duplicate code.

Compare that with code that uses inheritance:

/**
 * View1
 */
function View1 {
  this.viewId = 'view-1';
  this.template = '<some html here>'
}

View1.prototype.draw = function () {
  var ourView = document.getElementById(this.viewId);

  // ps. I know this is redundant, but it's here for illustration purposes.
  var newElement = document.createElement('div');
  ourView.appendChild(newElement);

  ourView.innerHTML = this.template;
};

/**
 * View2
 */
function View2 {
  this.viewId = 'view-2';
  this.template = '<some html here>'
}

View2.prototype = View1.prototype;

View2 never needs to re-implement code from View1. Instead, it simply reuses it.

share|improve this answer
    
this was very helpful... I was really getting stuck on the difference between properties declared as part of the constructor (in this case, viewId and template), and properties that are declared as part of the constructor's prototype (in this case, the draw method). You really explained the difference well. Thanks you taking the time! –  Bryce Johnson Feb 20 '14 at 16:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.