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Let me start by saying this is not related to the reliability of UDP as a protocol. I understand packets can be dropped, arrive out of order, etc. Also, this is not an issue of data rate strictly speaking (I am not trying to process way too many packets per second), nor is it an issue of the amount of data (not an issue with the size of the client's underlying buffer).

My typical UDP listener looks like this (VB.NET follows):

Private ListenSocket As System.Net.Sockets.UdpClient
Private UDPSyncResult As System.IAsyncResult
Private UDPState As New Object
Private ReadOnly UDPReadLock As New Object
Private Sub StartListening()
    Try
        ListenSocket = New System.Net.Sockets.UdpClient
        ListenSocket.Client.SetSocketOption( _
            Net.Sockets.SocketOptionLevel.Socket, _
            Net.Sockets.SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, True)
        ListenSocket.Client.Bind(New System.Net.IPEndPoint( _
            System.Net.IPAddress.Any, ListenPort))
        UDPSyncResult = ListenSocket.BeginReceive(AddressOf ProcessPacket, _
            UDPState)
    Catch ex As Exception
        'Handle an exception
    End Try
End Function

Private Sub ProcessPacket(ByVal ar As IAsyncResult)
    SyncLock UDPReadLock
        Try
            If ar Is UDPSyncResult Then
                Dim Data As Byte() = ListenSocket.EndReceive(ar, _
                    New System.Net.IPEndPoint(System.Net.IPAddress.Any, 0))
                ParsePacket(Data)
                UDPSyncResult = ListenSocket.BeginReceive( _
                    AddressOf ProcessPacket, UDPState)
            End If
        Catch ex As Exception
            Try
                UDPSyncResult = ListenSocket.BeginReceive( _
                    AddressOf ProcessPacket, UDPState)
            Catch ex2 As Exception
                'Do nothing
            End Try
        End Try
    End SyncLock
End Sub

ParsePacket would be a Sub that does something with the data.

If you have a server which is, for example, sending two packets "as fast as possible", each with say, 120 bytes of data, and each pair is sent once a second (so total datarate is low, however, two packets arrive at "exactly the same time") then what happens is that often times it can be seen that ProcessPacket gets called twice, but inevitably, it will be called once and then never again. That is, something is killing the entire detect packet, call the callback function mechanism.

It very much looks like an issue related to thread collisions, because it can work for a long time and then it will suddenly not work at all. Is there something wrong with my code?

For testing, the problem can easily be reproduced by running a simple server:

Private Sub StartTalking()
    Try
        TalkSocket = New System.Net.Sockets.UdpClient
        TalkSocket.Connect(System.Net.IPAddress.Parse(TalkIP), _
            TalkPort)
    Catch ex As Exception

    End Try
End Sub

Private Sub SendTwoPackets()
    Dim Packet As Byte() = AssemblePacket()
    Try
        TalkSocket.Send(Packet, Packet.Length)
        TalkSocket.Send(Packet, Packet.Length)
    Catch ex As Exception

    End Try
End Sub

Assign SendTwoPackets to a button and click away. AssemblePacket would be something that creates the data array to send.

EDIT

After rewriting my callback to make it a bit neater, I realized the issue was with my check of ar Is UDPSyncResult; if this was False, then I'd never call BeginReceive again. So now my callback looks more like this:

Private Sub ProcessPacket(ByVal ar As IAsyncResult)
    SyncLock UDPReadLock
        Try
            Dim Data As Byte() = ListenSocket.EndReceive(ar, _
                New System.Net.IPEndPoint(System.Net.IPAddress.Any, 0))
            ParsePacket(Data)
            UDPSyncResult = ListenSocket.BeginReceive( _
                AddressOf ProcessPacket, UDPState)
        Catch ex As Exception
            Try
                UDPSyncResult = ListenSocket.BeginReceive( _
                    AddressOf ProcessPacket, UDPState)
            Catch ex2 As Exception
                'Do nothing
            End Try
        End Try
    End SyncLock
End Sub

I read the MSDN article on asynchronous methods but honestly the use of a callback in that example is very confusing to me. In my code then I am now ignoring the IASyncResult passed to the callback, and I never use the "state object" passed to BeginReceive. Perhaps an expert can show me the "most correct" way of writing this callback?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a couple of things I see right off the bat:

You should only SyncLock your code for the bare minimum time to get the data. Not process it.

It also looks like you are trying to restart the listening in both the Try and Catch clauses. Move that to the Finally and it will work in both instances.

The last thing I would do would be to make ParsePacket run on its own thread each time it is called. Then you won't interfere with the receiving of data on the main thread. Take a look at this article on MSDN: Walkthrough: Authoring a Simple Multithreaded Component with Visual Basic

I would modify it to something like this:

Private Sub ProcessPacket(ByVal ar As IAsyncResult)
    Dim Data As Byte()

    SyncLock UDPReadLock
        Try
            Data = ListenSocket.EndReceive(ar, _
                New System.Net.IPEndPoint(System.Net.IPAddress.Any, 0))
        Catch ex As Exception
            ' Handle any exceptions here
        Finally
            Try
                UDPSyncResult = ListenSocket.BeginReceive( _
                    AddressOf ProcessPacket, UDPState)
            Catch ex As Exception
                ' Do nothing
            End Try
        End Try
    End SyncLock

    ' Only attempt to process if we received data
    If Data.Length > 0 Then
        ParsePacket(Data)
    End If
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comments. I believe putting ParsePacket on its own thread is superfluous, because the callback is already called on its own thread, no? – pelesl Jan 27 '14 at 0:04
    
I don't think so. Plus, you want ProcessPacket to respond as quickly as possible. – Adam Zuckerman Jan 27 '14 at 2:25
    
if it's not on it's own thread then why SyncLock? – pelesl Jan 31 '14 at 19:15
    
I just checked; every time the callback runs it's running on a "Working Thread" as Visual Studio's thread window describes it and System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId is different each time. That means the callback is on its own thread each time. So I don't see the point of using another thread. – pelesl Feb 6 '14 at 17:57
    
SyncLock can be used for threading, but its intended purpose was to prevent more than one process or thread from accessing a singular resource at a time. In your case, you don't want any other process to be able to use the socket while you are accessing it. ProcessPacket will always be on a worker thread because the call to ListenSocket.BeginReceive initiates another thread. ParsePacket will occur on the main thread by default. To prevent race conditions, I would execute ParsePacket on a separate thread. This will allow you to handle a situation where too many packets arrive together. – Adam Zuckerman Feb 6 '14 at 18:38

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