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I am having an issue with an explicit interface that I created and am getting the exception,

'x' does not contain a definition for 'y' and no extension method 'y' accepting a first argument of type 'x' could be found

I have a series of classes. The base class:

public interface IFactoryResponse
{
    object instance { get; set; }
    string instanceconfig { get; set; }
}

The class that explicitly implements it:

public class FactoryResponseImpl : IFactoryResponse
{
    object IFactoryResponse.instance {
        get { return ((IFactoryResponse)this).instance; }
        set { ((IFactoryResponse)this).instance = value; }
    }

    string IFactoryResponse.instanceconfig   {
        get { return ((IFactoryResponse)this).instanceconfig; }
        set { ((IFactoryResponse)this).instanceconfig = value; }
    }
}

and in another class I get the above error. Visual studio can find the interface and class ok, but it can't resolve the instance property. What am I missing here. I am probably missing one of the more refined rules of explicit inheritance.

if (facconfig.useabstract) {
    response.instance = Activator.CreateInstance(m_entassembly.GetType(entconfig.Classname, true, true));
    response.instanceconfig = facconfig.config;
} else {
    Assembly assem = Assembly.LoadFrom(facconfig.assemblyfile);
    object Obj = Activator.CreateInstance(assem.GetType(facconfig.Classname, true, true));
    response.instance = Obj;
    response.instanceconfig = facconfig.config;
}
share|improve this question
    
Is the interface defined in the same assembly? – Rowland Shaw Jan 26 '14 at 18:12
    
It is indeed defined in the same assembly – DmainEvent Jan 26 '14 at 18:13
    
you need to cast the object as that interface then you can see the properties – Jake Rote Jan 26 '14 at 18:13
1  
Isn't this a stack overflow exception waiting to happen? return ((IFactoryResponse)this).instance; – Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 26 '14 at 18:14
1  
Correct me if I'm wrong, but looks like your property call itself. – MarcinJuraszek Jan 26 '14 at 18:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Your implementation is incorrect. It will cause StackOverflowException because property calls itself. You can easily implement the properties using autoproperties:

    public class FactoryResponseImpl : IFactoryResponse
    {
        object IFactoryResponse.instance { get; set; }
    
        string IFactoryResponse.instanceconfig { get; set; }
    }
    
  2. When interface member is implemented explicitly you have to look at variable as the interface, either by casting your class instance to that interface or assigning it into a variable types as that interface.

    if (facconfig.useabstract) {
        ((IFactoryResponse)response).instance = Activator.CreateInstance(m_entassembly.GetType(entconfig.Classname, true, true));
        ((IFactoryResponse)response).instanceconfig = facconfig.config;
    } else {
        Assembly assem = Assembly.LoadFrom(facconfig.assemblyfile);
        object Obj = Activator.CreateInstance(assem.GetType(facconfig.Classname, true, true));
        ((IFactoryResponse)response).instance = Obj;
        ((IFactoryResponse)response).instanceconfig = facconfig.config;
    }
    
  3. Why do you need the interface to be implemented explicitly? You shouldn't do that unless you have very good reason. With implicit implementation everything is much easier:

    public class FactoryResponseImpl : IFactoryResponse
    {
        public object instance { get; set; }
    
        public string instanceconfig { get; set; }
    }
    

    And your other code should work just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a very good answer. Every time I think I know all I need to know I run into a problem like this. I need to go over this a bit more but I think your answer is the best one. I am just going to eliminate the explicit interfaces implementations. – DmainEvent Jan 26 '14 at 18:24

Your explicit implementations are referencing themselves. You should be referencing a private field or the public implementation. E.g.:

public class FactoryResponseImpl : IFactoryResponse
{
    DatabaseFactoryResponseInstance _instance;

    public FactoryResponseImpl()
    {
        _instance = new DatabaseFactoryResponseInstance();
    }

    object IFactoryResponse.instance {
    get { return (object)_instance; }
    set { 
            if (value != null)
            {
                DatabaseFactoryResponseInstance dbInstance;
                dbInstance = value as DatabaseFactoryResponseInstance;
                if (dbInstance == null)
                    throw new InvalidOperationException();

                _instance = dbInstance;
            }
         }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Where did the DatabaseFactoryResponseInstance come from? – DmainEvent Jan 26 '14 at 18:20
    
It is one possible implementation of the instance. – Keith Payne Jan 26 '14 at 18:22
    
duh, Silly me. I thought I missed something. – DmainEvent Jan 26 '14 at 18:30

Is this what you where aiming for?

public interface IFactoryResponse
        {
            object instance { get; set; }
            string instanceconfig { get; set; }
        }

        public class FactoryResponseImpl : IFactoryResponse
        {
            object IFactoryResponse.instance { get; set; }
            string IFactoryResponse.instanceconfig { get; set; }
        }

        class Test
        {
            public void TestMethod()
            {

                IFactoryResponse response = new FactoryResponseImpl();
                response.instance = null;
            } 
        }
share|improve this answer

If one uses explicit interface implementations like IFactoryResponse.instance, then these methods are not publicly visible. Either you need to cast to IFactoryResponse to access them or define the methods as public: public object instance { ... }.

share|improve this answer

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