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For a quadratic equation of the form y=a*x^2+b*x+c the max/min occurs at x=-b/2a. Is there any hard and fast equation like this for higher polynomials (x>=4). For such polynomials the solution which I got online suggested to plot the curve and find. How to find the absolute maxima without graphing?

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closed as off-topic by High Performance Mark, P0W, Sani Huttunen, AGS, Karoly Horvath Jan 26 at 18:51

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Yes, you are looking for the differential calculus, a branch of mathematics rather than of programming. Your question is off-topic here. –  High Performance Mark Jan 26 at 18:35
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This question appears to be off-topic because it belongs to math.stackexchange.com –  P0W Jan 26 at 18:36
    
    
"max/min occurs at x=-b/2a." - not quite. take, for example, the maximum. what you said is only true if a is negative. otherwise the curve goes on both sides to infinity. –  Karoly Horvath Jan 26 at 18:55

2 Answers 2

If you are dealing with polynomials only, then you should check libmatheval. I will not detail the mathematical theory behind this nor the C code needed, you will find a full reference here. However, here is a sketch of the algorithm:

  1. parse polynomial into function f
  2. calculate derivative of f, call it g (f')
  3. find zeroes of g with your favourite numerical method in a specified interval (maybe [MININT, MAXINT] or something similar).
  4. given the list from point above, evaluate f in each point.
  5. also evaluate f in the upper and lower bounds of the search interval used at point 3.
  6. keep the largest and the smallest value from points 4 and 5. Those are the absolute maximum and minimum.

In particular, the claim at point 6 is backed by a theoretical proof.

NOTE if you consider polynomials outside any restriction interval (i.e. from -inf to +inf), then they are unbounded, in the sense that their max or min (or both) is inifinity. Probably, you are interested in the finite max/min (if they exist). You could check if the max or min is supposed to be infinite, but you won't find this out from the algorithm above, because computation imposes a numerical bound on values:

  1. if the polynomial has an odd degree, then min = -inf and max = +inf.
  2. if the polynomial has an even degree, one between max and min is finite.
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Maybe replace "negative" by non-positive? You can also disregard second derivative altogether; will make code x2 slower but easier to write/understand. –  anatolyg Jan 26 at 18:47
    
@anatolyg "non-positive" will include both minima and inflection points (although I recognize that checking for 0 in the floating point world might be dangerous). Anyway, I modified the algorithm since the OP needs both min and max, so no more checking second derivative :) –  Stefano Sanfilippo Jan 26 at 18:51

You can solve this analytically using sympy for polynomials of degree <=5 by differentiating and solving for the gradient equal to 0.

Note that this will give several potential positions for the solution (including both both minimums and maximums) so you will have to evaluate the potential answers to find the actual maximum.

For example, using sympy we can compute the potential positions of a maximum for a quartic via:

from sympy import solve
from sympy.abc import a,b,c,d,e,x
f=a*x*x*x*x+b*x*x*x+c*x*x+d*x+e
A=solve(f.diff(x),x)
for sol in A:
    print sol

giving 3 potential positions:

(((d/(4*a) - b*c/(8*a**2) + b**3/(32*a**3))**2/4 + (c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))**3)**(1/2) + d/(8*a) - b*c/(16*a**2) + b**3/(64*a**3))**(1/3)*(1/2 + I*3**(1/2)/2) - (c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))/((1/2 + I*3**(1/2)/2)*(((d/(4*a) - b*c/(8*a**2) + b**3/(32*a**3))**2/4 + (c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))**3)**(1/2) + d/(8*a) - b*c/(16*a**2) + b**3/(64*a**3))**(1/3)) - b/(4*a)

(((d/(4*a) - b*c/(8*a**2) + b**3/(32*a**3))**2/4 + (c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))**3)**(1/2) + d/(8*a) - b*c/(16*a**2) + b**3/(64*a**3))**(1/3)*(1/2 - I*3**(1/2)/2) - (c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))/((1/2 - I*3**(1/2)/2)*(((d/(4*a) - b*c/(8*a**2) + b**3/(32*a**3))**2/4 + (c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))**3)**(1/2) + d/(8*a) - b*c/(16*a**2) + b**3/(64*a**3))**(1/3)) - b/(4*a)

(c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))/(((d/(4*a) - b*c/(8*a**2) + b**3/(32*a**3))**2/4 + (c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))**3)**(1/2) + d/(8*a) - b*c/(16*a**2) + b**3/(64*a**3))**(1/3) - b/(4*a) - (((d/(4*a) - b*c/(8*a**2) + b**3/(32*a**3))**2/4 + (c/(6*a) - b**2/(16*a**2))**3)**(1/2) + d/(8*a) - b*c/(16*a**2) + b**3/(64*a**3))**(1/3)

As noted in the comments, you should also check the value of the equation when x is its smallest and largest value.

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"You can solve this for polynomials of degree <=5" - there's no such restriction. the same method works for any polynomial –  Karoly Horvath Jan 26 at 18:52
    
also, solving the derivative = 0 equation is not enough. the function might not be bounded (it goes to +/- infinity). –  Karoly Horvath Jan 26 at 18:59
    
In particular, an polynomial of odd degree will be unbouded, and a polynomial of even degree with first coefficient positive will have a minimum, first coefficient negative will have a maximum. –  Jems Jan 26 at 19:08
    
@KarolyHorvath All I meant is that for polynomials of degree >5 this method will fail (using sympy) because there is not an analytical solution. –  Peter de Rivaz Jan 26 at 19:11
    
@PeterdeRivaz: then it's simply bad wording. you said this for the generic concept, not for the sympy implementation. moving the restriction to that paragraph will resolve the problem ;) –  Karoly Horvath Jan 26 at 19:13

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