Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a sh shell script.

Given data in a text file:
string1
string2 gibberish
gibberish
string3 gibberish
string4

How could you use awk or sed to remove all lines between string2(inclusive) and string3(not including string 3)?

to end up with:
string1
string3
string4

share|improve this question
    
Heh, if you're chopping out both string2 and string3 and everything in between, it's easy in sed: /string2/,/string3/d –  Chris Jester-Young Jan 26 '10 at 0:32
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can try this. Anything before "string2" will not be deleted.

awk 'BEGIN{f=0}
{
    match($0,"string2")
    if(RSTART){
        print substr($0,1,RSTART-1)
        f=1
        next
    }
    match($0,"string3")
    if(RSTART){
        $0=substr($0,RSTART)
        f=0
    }
}
f==0{print}
' file

output

$ cat file
string1 blah blah
text before string2 junk
gibberish
gibberis string3 text here
string4

$ ./shell.sh
string1 blah blah
text before
string3 text here
string4
share|improve this answer
    
Your input and output look right. Testing... –  user258895 Jan 26 '10 at 1:52
    
This is a comprehensive solution that works in my case. Thanks! –  user258895 Jan 26 '10 at 2:23
add comment

Are string1, string2,string3, etc. each on different lines? In that case, you can use awk:

awk '/string2/{flag=1} /string3/{flag=0} !flag'

or sed:

sed '/string3/p; /string2/,/string3/d'
share|improve this answer
1  
That is thoroughly rad. Sed & awk syntax never sticks with me so every time I see such things I liken it to magic. –  jsoverson Jan 26 '10 at 1:50
    
Those strings are on different lines. There's another word after each string that is dynamic. –  user258895 Jan 26 '10 at 1:51
    
These totally worked if they were on lines by themselves. But, I realized soon after you asked that there was some words before or after the string that didn't need to be erased that were on the same line. –  user258895 Jan 26 '10 at 2:23
    
Won't the above sed solution cause a doubling of a "string3" line is NOT preceded by a "string2" line? –  Beano Jan 27 '10 at 10:18
    
You are right, but given the question of the OP, I made the assumption that input file always contains a line containing "string2" before the one containing "string3" –  marco Jan 29 '10 at 1:22
add comment

The following will work in sed

sed  '
/string2/,/string3/bdeleting
b
:deleting
s/string3.*/string3/
/string3/b
d
'

presuming we are matching up to the first occurrence of string3 after string2

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's a sample regex substitution:

s/string2.*?(?=string3)//sg

Which will remove everything from string2 up to but not including string3.

share|improve this answer
    
I presume that's Perl, right? Cuz it doesn't look like either "awk or sed" (as the question states) to me. :-P –  Chris Jester-Young Jan 26 '10 at 0:32
    
Yeah, and sed doesn't do non-greedy either. –  David Kanarek Jan 26 '10 at 0:37
    
bad flag in substitute command: 's' Is that perl? –  user258895 Jan 26 '10 at 1:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.