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I have searched the reference and a general web, but I am unable to find out, if it exists.

Is there a way to get a pointer to the current function in C++? It is so trivial, that it should exist.

In the perfect world I would want to find a way to get an std::function of current function, but even an old style pointer would do.

To clarify why it may be needed: I am thinking about recursion inside a Lambda function or even general recursion in a function, with the high potential of the name change in the future releases.

share|improve this question
1  
You can use functions name as its pointer. And it has nothing to do with this – qwm Jan 26 '14 at 18:57
2  
A function is not instanciated, so there is no this. You can still use the normal pointer to your function (Even in a templated function this should work) – user1781290 Jan 26 '14 at 18:57
1  
I have to say, though the concept is not necessary, I still love the idea. For example a recursive function doesn't have to know its own name. If you rename it, you don't have to touch the body of the function. – Karoly Horvath Jan 26 '14 at 19:04
    
@KarolyHorvath I was thinking about recursion actually. But i'll live without it. – v010dya Jan 26 '14 at 19:08
1  
@KarolyHorvath: Related: stackoverflow.com/q/21143835/560648 – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 26 '14 at 19:32
up vote 4 down vote accepted

In general you can't. For example, in a lambda that's convertible to raw function pointer, there's no (standard language) way to obtain that pointer inside the function.

However, you can obtain the function name as a raw string, via the macro __func__, except that only the newest versions of the compilers provide it with that macro name.

Also, if you are OK with non-portable code there are several compiler-specific introspection facilities (I just know they exist, but would have to google them for you to list them).


Addressing the question's newly added part, how to let a function be recursive and still support easy name change and/or lambdas.

One way is to use a std::function, but much easier (and possibly a bit more efficient) is to just define the recursive function as an internal implementation detail, e.g. in a namespace or in an inner class:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void foo( int const x )
{
    struct Recursive {
        inline static void foo( int const x )
        {
            cout << x << ' ';
            if( x > 0 ) { foo( x - 1 ); }
        }
    };

    Recursive::foo( x );
    cout << endl;
}

auto main() -> int
{
    foo( 3 );
}

How to do the above with a lambda instead of a named function:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

auto main() -> int
{
    auto const foo = []( int const x ) -> void
    {
        struct Recursive {
            inline static void foo( int const x )
            {
                cout << x << ' ';
                if( x > 0 ) { foo( x - 1 ); }
            }
        };

        Recursive::foo( x );
        cout << endl;
    };

    foo( 3 );
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Out of interest, why auto main() -> int but void foo( int const x )? Just kicking the tyres, or is there some clever implication of the different styles? – Steve Jessop Jan 26 '14 at 19:41
    
@SteveJessop: there is clever implication. :) one has an expression result, the other has not. thus they're differentiated in some languages, e.g. Pascal function versus procedure. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 26 '14 at 20:49
    
Cool, thanks. So the convention breaks down if you write a function template returning a decltype (or other dependent type) that may or may not be void according to template arguments? ;-) That is to say, a few miscellaneous procedures might be defined using the function style, but otherwise you can tell the difference at a glance. – Steve Jessop Jan 26 '14 at 20:55
    
@SteveJessop; re "breaks down" in special case, yes, but if you're doing that then it reeks of design fault. ;-) simply don't. that's also the reason why some languages differentiate these syntactically, and why the C language's conflation of them is generally known as a Really Bad language design error. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 26 '14 at 20:59

There isn't, largely because there's no need for it. In the context of a (non-anonymous function) function, you always know where you stand - you can always use its name to refer to it or get its address. Unlike objects, where different ones have different addresses, ergo the need for this.

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@Cheersandhth.-Alf correct, those skipped my mind. – Luchian Grigore Jan 26 '14 at 19:09
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf So no recursion inside the Lambda ever? – v010dya Jan 26 '14 at 19:11
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf I'm not sure I understand your point about template instantiations though, can you expand? – Luchian Grigore Jan 26 '14 at 19:11
    
@Volodya stackoverflow.com/questions/2067988/… – Luchian Grigore Jan 26 '14 at 19:12
    
@LuchianGrigore: well you can use the name with the template arguments supplied (provided there are no overloads, I guess), but not the name on its own. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 26 '14 at 19:14

If the purpose is just to obtain a std::function object, you might use the function name itself:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;

void functionA(int a);

void functionA(int a)
{
    cout << "Thanks for calling me with " << a << endl;

    if(a == 22)
        return;

    std::function<void(int)> f_display = functionA;

    f_display(22);
}

int main() {

    functionA(1);

    return 0;
}

http://ideone.com/4C9gc5

but this isn't immune to name changing unfortunately. You might also encapsulate the function into something else to get rid of name changing:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;

void functionA(int a)
{
    cout << "Thanks for calling me with " << a << endl;
}

template <typename F>
void encapsulateFunction(F f, int val)
{
    std::function<void(int)> f_display = f;

    // f_display now points to the function encapsulated
    f_display(val);
}



int main() {

    encapsulateFunction(functionA, 22);

    return 0;
}

http://ideone.com/5Xb0ML

share|improve this answer

you can do this:

std::map<string, boost::any> functions;
int foo(int x) {
   int (*fp)(int) = boost::any_cast<int (*)(int)>(functions[__func__]); 
   return x;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int (*fooPointer)(int) = foo;
    boost::any fp = fooPointer;
    functions["foo"] = fp;
    ...
}

insert a reference to the function into a global map and retrieve it from within the function. There's still room for encapsulating the map but I hope the idea is clear.

In c++ function is not a first class citizen so you will have to work a bit to get the function's reference.

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If you want to get a reference to a function then you need to use a function pointer and assign a value to it. Can you do it in any other way? – Ezra Jan 26 '14 at 19:23
    
Reread the question: "Is there a way to get a pointer to the current function in C++?" – kotlomoy Jan 26 '14 at 19:25
    
sure, now you have to pass that reference into the function, either through a parameter, or through global variable. I would wrap it with a macro. – Ezra Jan 26 '14 at 19:27
1  
please, don't... – Karoly Horvath Jan 26 '14 at 19:28
    
I am here to learn but I still didn't see any other way of doing it. Not that I have ever needed such a thing. – Ezra Jan 26 '14 at 19:29

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