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I have a named pipe created via the os.mkfifo() command. I have two different Python processes accessing this named pipe, process A is reading, and process B is writing. Process A uses the select function to determine when there is data available in the fifo/pipe. Despite the fact that process B flushes after each write call, process A's select function does not always return (it keeps blocking as if there is no new data). After looking into this issue extensively, I finally just programmed process B to add 5KB of garbage writes before and after my real call, and likewise process A is programmed to ignore those 5KB. Now everything works fine, and select is always returning appropriately. I came to this hack-ish solution by noticing that process A's select would return if process B were to be killed (after it was writing and flushing, it would sleep on a read pipe). Is there a problem with flush in Python for named pipes?

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could you publish some minimal test code that show the problem. As you describe the problem about a dozen of lines should be enough. –  kriss Mar 25 '10 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

The flush operation is irrelevant for named pipes; the data for named pipes is held strictly in memory, and won't be released until it is read or the FIFO is closed.

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The flush operation can still be relevant if data output to the pipe is buffered at the application level. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 26 '10 at 2:09
    
I'm guessing that there is buffering at the application level, does anyone know of any bug? –  BrainCore Jan 26 '10 at 3:10

What APIs are you using? os.read() and os.write() don't buffer anything.

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To find out if Python's internal buffering is causing your problems, when running your scripts do "python -u" instead of "python". This will force python in to "unbuffered mode" which will cause all output to be printed instantaneously.

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