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I developed a scripting engine that has many built-in functions, so to call any function, my code just went into an if .. else if .. else if wall checking the name but I would like to develop a more efficient solution.

Should I use a hashmap with strings as keys and pointers as values? How could I do it by using an STL map?

EDIT: Another point that came into my mind: of course using a map will force the compiler not to inline functions, but my inefficient approach didn't have any overhead generated by the necessity of function calls, it just executes code.

So I wonder if the overhead generated by the function call will be any better than having an if..else chain.. otherwise I could minimize the number of comparisons by checking a character at runtime (will be longer but faster).

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5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Whatever your function signatures are:

typedef void (*ScriptFunction)(void); // function pointer type
typedef std::map<std::string, ScriptFunction> script_map;

// ...

void some_function(void)
{
}

// ...

script_map m;
m.insert(std::make_pair("blah", &some_function));

// ...

void call_script(const std::string& pFunction)
{
    script_map::const_iterator iter = m.find(pFuntion);
    if (iter == m.end())
    {
        // not found
    }

    (*iter->second)();
}

STL doesn't have a hash-map implementation. But you can use either TR1 or Boost to get unordered_map, which is your hash map.

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1  
Also there really is no need to use a real hash table like unordered_map. There won't be that many elements that a hash table would bring performance advantages, I even wouldn't be surprised if map were faster in this case. –  sth Jan 26 '10 at 1:41
2  
Actually, I've done some similar stuff and unordered_map was much faster. I had only about 10,000 things in it, and I profiled both map and unordered_map. –  GManNickG Jan 26 '10 at 1:46
1  
I'd expect "many builtin functions" << 10.000. Hasmap in the OP's case has the clear advantage of being "true O(1)" since it doesn't have to grow, and a collision-free hash could be constructed for the strings. I doubt that it makes a significant difference compared to a map for even a few 100 items. –  peterchen Jan 26 '10 at 8:35
    
Actually "many builtin functions" is like ~100. Of course they can grow with time but undoubtely they'll reach 1000. I'll try with the map. Also because I didn't use Boost so far and I would avoid that (just because I really finished everything apart from some optimizations). –  Jack Jan 26 '10 at 14:19
    
Does this actually work? Don't you still need to retrieve the function pointer out of the map? i.e. the second last line should be (*(iter->second))(); or something. –  Ben Farmer May 7 '14 at 3:30

I tried to use the second answer with c++11. I had to change the last line from:
(*iter)();
to:
(*iter->second)();

so the code is now:

    #include <map>

    typedef void (*ScriptFunction)(void); // function pointer type
    typedef std::map<std::string, ScriptFunction> script_map;

    // ...

    void some_function(void)
    {
    }
    script_map m;

    void call_script(const std::string& pFunction)
    {
        script_map::const_iterator iter = m.find(pFunction);
        if (iter == m.end())
        {
            // not found
        }
        (*iter->second)();
    }

    int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
    {
        //..
        m.insert(std::make_pair("blah", &some_function));

        call_script("blah");
        //..
        return 0;
    }
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Above answers seem to give a complete overview, this regards only your second question:

Map element retrieval by key has O(log n) complexity. Hashmap retrieval by key has O(1) complexity + a little stuff on the side in case of collisions. So if theres a good hash function for your function names, use it. Your implementation will have a standard one. It should be fine.

But be aware, that anything below a hundred elements will not benefit all too much.

The only downside of a hash map is collision. In your case, the hashmap will be relatively static. You know the function names you support. So I advise you to create a simple test case, where you call unordered_map<...>::hash_function with all your keys to make sure that nothing collides. After that, you can forget about it.

A quick google for potential improvements on hash functions got me there:

A fiew good hash functions

Maybe, depending on your naming conventions, you can improve on some aspects of the function.

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You can also use Boost.Function and Boost.Bind what even allows you, to some degree, to have map of heterogeneous functions:

typedef boost::function<void, void> fun_t;
typedef std::map<std::string, fun_t> funs_t;
funs_t f;

void foo() {}
void goo(std::string& p) {}
void bar(int& p) {}

f["foo"] = foo;
f["goo"] = boost::bind(goo, "I am goo");
f["bar"] = boost::bind(bar, int(17));

It can be a map of functions of compatible prototypes as well, of course.

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This didnt' work for me. i got a compiler error. 'boost::function' : too many template arguments –  excray Mar 22 '11 at 11:35
    
@vivek-g, there are many problems possible, compiler version, missing include, etc. It does compile and run for me as well as for codepad: codepad.org/ciKTrh2r –  mloskot Mar 22 '11 at 15:59
1  
@mloskot, thank you for awesome example! –  Vitaly Isaev Mar 19 '14 at 14:50

Well, you can use any_map to store functions with different signatures (but calling it will be messy) and you can use int_map to call functions with a specific signature (looks nicer).

int FuncA()
{
    return 1;
}

float FuncB()
{
    return 2;
}


void main()
{
    // Int map
    map<string,int(*)()> int_map;
    int_map["A"] = FuncA;
    // Call it
    cout<<int_map["A"]()<<endl;

    // Add it to your map
    map<string, void(*)> any_map;
    any_map["A"] = FuncA;
    any_map["B"] = FuncB;

    // Call
    cout<<reinterpret_cast<float(*)()>(any_map["B"])()<<endl;
}
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1  
Actually, I find this very useful. You can basically write your own functions that wrap up the reinterpreting (i.e. float my_b(){ return reinterpret.....}. –  Ben J Oct 17 '12 at 15:38
2  
Did you really just write void main in a C++ program? –  LB-- Oct 1 '13 at 18:48
    
@LB--: Why don't you edit it? Oh wait .. 140 rep. –  Jacob Oct 1 '13 at 22:03

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