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Bitwise Operators are pretty interesting so I tried figuring out a way to have the opposite effect of or, but not the effect of xor.

If I have two chars (8 bit):

char1    char2
=====    =====
1010     1000

after transformation

1000     1000

If 0010 is the value I want to transfer char1 and char2 to disable at that registrar (position 1)

How would I do that?

or only sets 1 if 1 and 1, and xor only swaps values if 1 and 0 or 0 and 1

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1  
xor will give 1 when the bits are different... it doesn't "swap" them exactly. So 1010 xor'ed with 1000 gives 0010... is that what you want? –  Dmitri Jan 27 '14 at 7:08
    
Sorry for not being elaborate. 1010 something 0010 should give the value 1000, in addition 1000 and 0010 should give 1000 –  MysteryDev Jan 27 '14 at 7:11
    
@MysteryDev Those are contradicting requirements, or the operator you are looking for is not a built-in one, all of which are symmetric. –  user529758 Jan 27 '14 at 7:13
2  
Are you just trying to zero a specified bit if it's set? In that case, you want to NOT the second value, then AND... x & ~y –  Dmitri Jan 27 '14 at 7:15
2  
To solve these sorts of problems in the future try writing a "truth table". That is, suppose the relation is called #. Now write down all the cases; there are only four. You want 1#1=0, 1#0=1, 0#1=0 and 0#0=0. Now look at that. There's only a single 1 as the output. There is only one condition in which a#b is 1, and that is if a is 1 and b is 0. Now it is easy to see that you want a and not b. –  Eric Lippert Jan 27 '14 at 16:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The opposite of or is and-not. You can use or to set bits, and and-not to clear bits.

#include <assert.h>

int main() {
    int a = 16, b, c;

    // Set bit 3
    b = a | 1<<3; // OR
    assert(b == (8+16));


    // Clear bit 3
    c = b & ~(1<<3); // AND-NOT
    assert(c == 16);
}
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+1 : You can use or to set bits, and and-not to clear bits –  Pranit Kothari Jan 27 '14 at 8:26

I believe you want & (and):

1100 & 1010 = 1000

It's often used with inversion to set specific bits to 0.

1100 & ~0100 = 1100 & 1011 = 1000
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