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I've seen some examples of C++ using template template parameters (that is templates which take templates as parameters) to do policy-based class design. What other uses does this technique have?

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I really don't see how this is a bad question at all, templates can be quite confusing in c++, and considering other questions allowed to live on this site it would be nice if this question provided a comprehensive answer as to how template template parameters work –  aaronman Sep 9 '13 at 19:57
1  
I came from the other direction (FP, Haskell etc) and landed on this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2565097/higher-kinded-types-with-c –  Erik Allik Mar 2 at 3:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 65 down vote accepted

I think you need to use template template syntax to pass a param whose type is a template dependant on another template like this:

template<template<class> class H, class S>
void f(const H<S> &value) {
}

Here, H is a type which is templated, but I wanted this function to deal with all specializations of H.

NOTE: I've been programming c++ for many years and have only needed this once, I find that it is a rarely needed feature (of course handy when you need it!).

EDIT: I've been trying to think of good examples, and to be honest, most of the time this isn't neccessary, but let's contrive an example. Let's pretend that std::vector doesn't have a typedef value_type. So how would you write a function which can create variables of the right type for the vectors elements? This would have worked.

template<template<class> class V, class T>
void f(const V<T> &v) {
    // this can be V::value_type, but we are pretending we don't have it
    T temp = v.back();
    // do some work on temp
}

This actually doesn't work with std::vector because it has 2 template params not 1, but if we had a class with the same interface as std::vector but didn't have a value_type, then this would be a way to know the type inside the function.

Finally, here's a version which does work with std::vector:

template<template<class, class> class V, class T>
void f(V<T, std::allocator<T> > &v) {
    // this can be "typename V<T, std::allocator<T> >::value_type", 
    //but we are pretending we don't have it
    T temp = v.back();
    v.pop_back();
    // do some work on temp
    std::cout << temp << std::endl;
}

which you can use like this:

f<std::vector, int>(v); // v is of type std::vector<int> using the standard allocator
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If f is a function defined by the user of a library, it is ugly that the user needs to pass std::allocator<T> as an argument. I would have expected that the version without the std::allocator argument have worked using the default parameter of std::vector. Are there any updates on this wrt C++0x? –  phaedrus Jan 13 '11 at 5:19
    
Well, you don't have to provide allocator. What's important is that template template parameter was defined over correct number of arguments. But the function should not care what's their "types" or meaning, following works well in C++98: template<template<class, class> class C, class T, class U> void f(C<T, U> &v) –  pfalcon Jan 14 '13 at 2:13
    
I wonder why instantiation is f<vector,int> and not f<vector<int>>. –  bobobobo Dec 17 '13 at 16:15
    
@bobobobo These two mean different things. f<vector,int> means f<ATemplate,AType>, f<vector<int>> means f<AType> –  user362515 Jun 12 at 21:06

Here is a simple example taken from 'Modern C++ Design - Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied' by Andrei Alexandrescu:

He uses a classes with template template parameters in order to implement the policy pattern:

// Library code
template <template <class> class CreationPolicy>
class WidgetManager : public CreationPolicy<Widget>
{
   ...
};

He explains: Typically, the host class already knows, or can easily deduce, the template argument of the policy class. In the example above, WidgetManager always manages objects of type Widget, so requiring the user to specify Widget again in the instantiation of CreationPolicy is redundant and potentially dangerous.In this case, library code can use template template parameters for specifying policies.

The effect is that the client code can use 'WidgetManager' in a more elegant way:

typedef WidgetManager<MyCreationPolicy> MyWidgetMgr;

Instead of the more cumbersome, and error prone way that a definition lacking template template arguments would have required:

typedef WidgetManager< MyCreationPolicy<Widget> > MyWidgetMgr;
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Actually, usecase for template template parameters is rather obvious. Once you learn that C++ stdlib has gaping hole of not defining stream output operators for standard container types, you would proceed to write something like:

template<typename T>
static inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, std::list<T> const& v)
{
    out << '[';
    if (!v.empty()) {
        for (typename std::list<T>::const_iterator i = v.begin(); ;) {
            out << *i;
            if (++i == v.end())
                break;
            out << ", ";
        }
    }
    out << ']';
    return out;
}

Then you'd figure out that code for vector is just the same, for forward_list is the same, actually, even for multitude of map types it's still just the same. Those template classes don't have anything in common except for meta-interface/protocol, and using template template parameter allows to capture the commonality in all of them. Before proceeding to write a template though, it's worth to check a reference to recall that sequence containers accept 2 template arguments - for value type and allocator. While allocator is defaulted, we still should account for its existence in our template operator<<:

template<template <typename, typename> class Container, class V, class A>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, Container<V, A> const& v)
...

Voila, that will work automagically for all present and future sequence containers adhering to the standard protocol. To add maps to the mix, it would take a peek at reference to note that they accept 4 template params, so we'd need another version of the operator<< above with 4-arg template template param. We'd also see that std:pair tries to be rendered with 2-arg operator<< for sequence types we defined previously, so we would provide a specialization just for std::pair.

Btw, with C+11 which allows variadic templates (and thus should allow variadic template template args), it would be possible to have single operator<< to rule them all. For example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <deque>
#include <list>

template<typename T, template<class,class...> class C, class... Args>
std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const C<T,Args...>& objs)
{
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << '\n';
    for (auto const& obj : objs)
        os << obj << ' ';
    return os;
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<float> vf { 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4 };
    std::cout << vf << '\n';

    std::list<char> lc { 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd' };
    std::cout << lc << '\n';

    std::deque<int> di { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
    std::cout << di << '\n';

    return 0;
}

Output

std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &, const C<T, Args...> &) [T = float, C = vector, Args = <std::__1::allocator<float>>]
1.1 2.2 3.3 4.4 
std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &, const C<T, Args...> &) [T = char, C = list, Args = <std::__1::allocator<char>>]
a b c d 
std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &, const C<T, Args...> &) [T = int, C = deque, Args = <std::__1::allocator<int>>]
1 2 3 4 
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This is such a sweet example of template template parameters, as it shows a case that everybody has had to deal with. –  Ravenwater Feb 4 '13 at 0:24
1  
+1, added C++11 example using variadic templates. –  WhozCraig May 31 at 18:45
    
This is the most awakening answer for me in C++ templates. @WhozCraig How did you get the template expansion details? –  Arun Sep 14 at 5:51
    
@Arun gcc supports a macro called __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, which, among other things, reports template parameter descriptions in plain text. clang does it as well. A most-handy feature sometimes (as you can see). –  WhozCraig Sep 14 at 5:53

Here's another practical example from my CUDA Convolutional neural network library. I have the following class template:

template <class T> class Tensor

which is actually implements n-dimensional matrices manipulation. There's also a child class template:

template <class T> class TensorGPU : public Tensor<T>

which implements the same functionality but in GPU. Both templates can work with all basic types, like float, double, int, etc And I also have a class template (simplified):

template <template <class> class TT, class T> class CLayerT: public Layer<TT<T> >
{
    TT<T> weights;
    TT<T> inputs;
    TT<int> connection_matrix;
}

The reason here to have template template syntax is because I can declare implementation of the class

class CLayerCuda: public CLayerT<TensorGPU, float>

which will have both weights and inputs of type float and on GPU, but connection_matrix will always be int, either on CPU (by specifying TT = Tensor) or on GPU (by specifying TT=TensorGPU).

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Old question, but here's an answer anyway. I just worked this one out now.

Say you're using CRTP to provide an "interface" for a set of child templates; and both the parent and the child are parametric in other template argument(s):

template <typename DERIVED, typename VALUE> class interface {
    void do_something(VALUE v) {
        static_cast<DERIVED*>(this)->do_something(v);
    }
};

template <typename VALUE> class derived : public interface<DERIVED, VALUE> {
    void do_something(VALUE v) { ... }
};

typedef interface<derived<int>, int> derived_t;

Note the duplication of 'int', which is actually the same type parameter specified to both templates. You can use a template template for DERIVED to avoid this duplication:

template <template <typename> class DERIVED, typename VALUE> class interface {
    void do_something(VALUE v) {
        static_cast<DERIVED<VALUE>*>(this)->do_something(v);
    }
};

template <typename VALUE> class derived : public interface<DERIVED, VALUE> {
    void do_something(VALUE v) { ... }
};

typedef interface<derived, int> derived_t;

Note that you are eliminating directly providing the other template parameter(s) to the derived template; the "interface" still receives them.

This also lets you build up typedefs in the "interface" that depend on the type parameters, which will be accessible from the derived template.

EDIT:

The above typedef doesn't work because you can't typedef to an unspecified template. This works, however (and C++11 has native support for template typedefs):

template <typename VALUE>
struct derived_interface_type {
    typedef typename interface<derived, VALUE> type;
};

typedef typename derived_interface_type<int>::type derived_t;

You need one derived_interface_type for each instantiation of the derived template unfortunately, unless there's another trick I haven't learned yet.

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This is what I ran into:

template<class A>
class B
{
  A& a;
}

template<class B>
class A
{
  B b;
}

class AInstance : A<B<A<B<A<B<A<B<... (oh oh)>>>>>>>>
{

}

Can be solved to:

template<class A>
class B
{
  A& a;
}

template< template<class> class B>
class A
{
  B<A> b;
}

class AInstance : A<B> //happy
{

}

or (working code):

template<class A>
class B
{
public:
    A* a;
    int GetInt() { return a->dummy; }
};

template< template<class> class B>
class A
{
public:
    A() : dummy(3) { b.a = this; }
    B<A> b;
    int dummy;
};

class AInstance : public A<B> //happy
{
public:
    void Print() { std::cout << b.GetInt(); }
};

int main()
{
    std::cout << "hello";
    AInstance test;
    test.Print();
}
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