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I'm trying to make a wrapper for values that allows callers to register themselves for notifications about it. Here's some (working) code:

module Thing :
  sig
    type +'a t
    val make : 'a -> 'a t
    val watch : ('a -> unit) -> 'a t -> unit
    val notify : 'a t -> unit
  end = struct
    type 'a t = {
      obj : 'a;
      watchers : (unit -> unit) Queue.t
    }

    let make x = {
      obj = x;
      watchers = Queue.create ()
    }

    let watch fn x =
      x.watchers |> Queue.add (fun () -> fn x.obj) 

    let notify x =
      x.watchers |> Queue.iter (fun fn -> fn ())
  end

let () =
  let x = Thing.make (`Int 4) in
  Thing.watch (fun (`Int d) -> Printf.printf "Observed %d\n" d) x;
  let x = (x :> [`Int of int | `None] Thing.t) in
  Thing.notify x

However, this seems inefficient. Each queued watcher is a new closure with its own reference to the thing. It would make more sense to queue just the user's callback and add the x in notify, e.g.

  ... = struct
    type 'a t = {
      obj : 'a;
      watchers : ('a -> unit) Queue.t
    }

    let make x = {
      obj = x;
      watchers = Queue.create ()
    }

    let watch fn x =
      x.watchers |> Queue.add fn

    let notify x =
      x.watchers |> Queue.iter (fun fn -> fn x.obj)
  end

But having the 'a as part of the queue type means that 'a t is no longer covariant. I understand why this happens, but does anyone have a solution? i.e. how can I show OCaml that it's safe in this case?

share|improve this question
    
I must be missing something obvious about why it would be safe - If 'b is a subtype of 'a, if you cast a 'b t to an 'a t then can't someone notify an 'a to a watcher that expects a 'b? –  Ganesh Sittampalam Jan 27 '14 at 10:09
    
The module's public API doesn't allow you to send an arbitrary 'a to the watchers, only the original value (which is really a 'b). Another way to look at it is that the inefficient version is safe, and the efficient version has the same behaviour. –  Thomas Leonard Jan 27 '14 at 10:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can shift the place of capture:

module Thing :
  sig
    type +'a t
    val make : 'a -> 'a t
    val watch : ('a -> unit) -> 'a t -> unit
    val notify : 'a t -> unit
  end = struct
    type 'a t = {
      obj : 'a;
      watch : ('a -> unit) -> unit;
      notify : unit -> unit;
    }

    let make x =
      let queue = Queue.create () in
      let obj = x in
      let watch f = Queue.add f queue in
      let notify () = Queue.iter (fun f -> f x) queue in
      { obj; watch; notify; }

    let watch fn x = x.watch fn
    let notify x = x.notify ()
  end

If you want to feel really economical:

    let make x =
      let queue = Queue.create () in
      let obj = x in
      let rec watch f = Queue.add f queue
      and notify () = Queue.iter (fun f -> f x) queue in
      { obj; watch; notify; }
share|improve this answer
1  
What's the advantage of the "let rec" version? –  Thomas Leonard Jan 27 '14 at 12:51
1  
They will share the closure environment. –  Daniel Bünzli Feb 1 '14 at 19:28

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