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I have the following Node.js project (which is a Minimal Working Example of my problem):

module1.js:

module.exports = function() {
    return "this is module1!";
};

module2.js:

var module1 = require('./module1');
module.exports = function() {
    return module1()+" and this is module2!";
};

server.js:

var module2 = require('./module2');
console.log(module2());  // prints: "this is module1! and this is module2!"

Now I want to create a client.html file that will also use module2.js. Here is what I tried (and failed):

naive version:

<script src='module2.js'></script>
<script>alert(module2());</script> // should alert: "this is module1! and this is module2!"

This obviously doesn't work - it produces two errors:

  • ReferenceError: require is not defined.
  • ReferenceError: module2 is not defined.

Using Node-Browserify: After running:

browserify module2.js > module2.browserified.js

I changed client.html to:

<script src='require.js'></script>
<script>
    var module2 = require('module2');
    alert(module2());
</script>

This doesn't work - it produces one error:

  • ReferenceError: module2 is not defined.

Using Smoothie.js by @Torben :

<script src='require.js'></script>
<script>
    var module2 = require('module2');
    alert(module2());
</script>

This doesn't work - it produces three errors:

  • syntax error on module2.js line 1.
  • SmoothieError: unable to load module2 (0 )
  • TypeError: module2 is not a function

I looked at require.js but it looks too complicated to combine with Node.js - I didn't find a simple example that just takes an existing Node.js module and loads it into a web page (like in the example).

I looked at head.js and lab.js but found no mention of Node.js's require.

So, what should I do in order to use my existing Node.js module, module2.js, from an HTML page?

share|improve this question
    
To the best of my knowledge you cannot call your node modules from HTML pages. For that you will need to pass the data from server.js to HTML page using a template library. – umair Jan 27 '14 at 10:12
    
@umair I don't need the client.html page to contact the server.js program - they are two independent applications. – Erel Segal-Halevi Jan 27 '14 at 10:18
    
Then write them as javascript functions rather than node modules and include the script in your HTML – umair Jan 27 '14 at 10:33
    
I want to use the same module, module2.js, both in client.html and in server.js, without duplicating code. – Erel Segal-Halevi Jan 27 '14 at 12:03
    
Have you verified in your server log that your require('module2') is finding the file you expect it to find? Like, is that file publicly available? – juanpaco Jan 27 '14 at 12:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that you're using CJS modules, but still try to play old way with inline scripts. That won't work, it's either this or that.

To take full advantage of CJS style, organize your client-side code exactly same way as you would for server-side, so:

Create client.js:

var module2 = require('./module2');
console.log(module2());  // prints: "this is module1! and this is module2!"

Create bundle with Browserify (or other CJS bundler of your choice):

browserify client.js > client.bundle.js

Include generated bundle in HTML:

<script src="client.bundle.js"></script>

After page is loaded you should see "this is module1! and this is module2!" in browser console

share|improve this answer
    
This works, thanks! – Erel Segal-Halevi Jan 28 '14 at 7:54

You can also try simq with which I can help you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The reason I don't use simq is that it requires a configuration file, while my needs are much simpler and can be solved without a configuration file. – Erel Segal-Halevi Jan 28 '14 at 7:55
    
Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. – SuperBiasedMan Oct 22 '15 at 11:06
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – Marcelo Oct 22 '15 at 11:17

Your problems with Smoothie Require, were caused by a bug (https://github.com/letorbi/smoothie/issues/3). My latest commit fixed this bug, so your example should work without any changes now.

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