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I'm currently working with a PLC that supports ANSI C, but uses its own flavour of the GNU compiler, which doesn't compile any variadic functions and things like itoa. So using sprintf & co. isn't an option for converting integers to strings. Can anyone guide me to a site where a robust, sprintf- free implementation of itoa is listed or post a suitable algorithm here? Thanks in advance.

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4  
So it does not support ANSI C. –  KeatsPeeks Jan 26 '10 at 8:34
1  
Well yes. This is indeed an ongoing discussion with the SPC providers marketing department ;) –  NullAndVoid Jan 26 '10 at 11:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is from K&R:

void itoa(int n, char s[])
{
    int i, sign;

    if ((sign = n) < 0)  /* record sign */
        n = -n;          /* make n positive */
    i = 0;
    do {       /* generate digits in reverse order */
        s[i++] = n % 10 + '0';   /* get next digit */
    } while ((n /= 10) > 0);     /* delete it */
    if (sign < 0)
        s[i++] = '-';
    s[i] = '\0';
    reverse(s);
} 

reverse() just reverses a string.

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Use this version with care as it can overflow the buffer. –  R Samuel Klatchko Jan 26 '10 at 8:39
1  
Yes, that's true. The caller has to know if the buffer has enough space or not. Just like sprintf(). –  Alok Singhal Jan 26 '10 at 8:42
    
Which is why you should never use sprintf() and only use snprintf() –  R Samuel Klatchko Jan 26 '10 at 8:48
2  
I agree with you, if you replace "never" with "almost never". In general, one should prefer snprintf(). But if one is sure that the target buffer has the required size, sprintf() is fine too. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1996374/… for example. –  Alok Singhal Jan 26 '10 at 9:14

Just for the sake of completeness and as a reference for others that may stumble upon the subject, I added this link to a recursive implementation of itoa http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1993571/itoa-recursively which I like because of its simple beauty, but can't use for my target system.

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