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I just started learning C++ by myself recently. I came across this problem: print out all the integers between 1 and 100 that can't be divisible by 3,or 5,or 7. I used both for and while loops in two different tests, for loop works okay, but the underscore keeps flashing after two loops for while loop. pictures attached. Could anyone help me check my codes, please? Thank you!!

for loop--------- #include using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int i=1;
    for(i=0;i<=100;i++)
    {
        if(i%3==0||i%5==0||i%7==0)
        {
            continue;
        }
        cout<<i<<" ";

    }
    return 0;

} 

enter image description here

while loop------ #include using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int i=1;
    while(i<=100)
    {
        if(i%3==0||i%5==0||i%7==0)
        {
            continue;
        }
        cout<<i<<" ";
        i++;
    }
    return 0;

}

enter image description here

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6  
continue skips everything left in that loop iteration. That includes i++. Note: stepping through with a debugger would make this plain to see. –  chris Jan 27 at 14:12
    
if the goal is to test and print for values from 1 to 100, it's more optimal to express the for loop as for(int i=1; i<=100; i++) because this avoids a) starting at zero "for(i=0" and b) doing the initial assignment to i twice "int i=1;" sets i to 1, and "for(i=0" sets it back to 0 when starting the loop. –  wonko realtime Jan 27 at 14:29
    
possible duplicate of C++ Continue Statement Confusion –  Mike Seymour Jan 27 at 14:43
    
thank you all!! –  user3858 Jan 30 at 2:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem with the while loop is that when the continue statement is executed the value of control variable i is not changed.

while(i<=100)
{
    if(i%3==0||i%5==0||i%7==0)
    {
        continue;
    }
    cout<<i<<" ";
    i++;
}

So it would be better 1) do not use continue; 2) to place changing of i into the while statement.

I would rewrite the loop the following way

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int i = 0;
    while ( ++i <= 100 )
    {
        if ( i % 3 != 0 && i % 5 != 0 && i % 7 != 0 )
        {
            cout << i << ' ';
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

Also take into account that the code in the first program confuses readers.

int i=1;
for(i=0;i<=100;i++)

At first you assigned i 1 and then in the loop statement you reassigned i. It would be better if i would be a local variable of the code block that is if the loop would be written as

for ( int i = 1; i <= 100; i++ )
share
    
Ugh! Use a for-loop when you want to modify on each iteration. –  Sebastian Redl Jan 27 at 14:21
1  
@Sebastian Redl The author wants to test two forms of loops. –  Vlad from Moscow Jan 27 at 14:23
1  
Right, reading comprehension fail. I still think variable modification in the header of a while-loop is horrible. You already reversed the if-condition and got rid of the continue; why not put the ++i back at the end of the loop where it belongs? –  Sebastian Redl Jan 27 at 14:26
1  
Obviously a for-loop would be the best choice here, because it avoids the changing body issue, so the discussion is pretty much moot. But given that very fact - that modifications in the header are better left to for-loops - means that I, for one, would be very likely to overlook the side effect in the while-loop header because that's just not where side effects are supposed to be. –  Sebastian Redl Jan 27 at 15:12
2  
You are entitled to your own opinion on the matter. I'm not here to convince you; I know that is generally an impossible task. –  Sebastian Redl Jan 27 at 15:24

The while loop can be tweaked a little to work the way you intended it to:

while(i<=100)
{
  if(!(i%3==0||i%5==0||i%7==0))
  {
     cout<<i<<" ";
  }
  i++;
}
share

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