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How can one programmatically sort a union query when pulling data from two tables? For example,

SELECT table1.field1 FROM table1 ORDER BY table1.field1
UNION
SELECT table2.field1 FROM table2 ORDER BY table2.field1

Throws an exception

Note: this is being attempted on MS Access Jet database engine

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5  
Expect odd semantics from the Jet "database" engine. –  yfeldblum Oct 17 '08 at 21:18

12 Answers 12

up vote 52 down vote accepted
SELECT Tbl1.field1
FROM ( SELECT field1 FROM table1
       UNION
       SELECT field1 FROM table2
     ) Tbl1
ORDER BY Tbl1.field1
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9  
This technically doesn't accomplish what you were logically asking in the original question. –  Ian Boyd Sep 10 '10 at 14:49
2  
@Ian Boyd: I take your point but what they are asking makes no logical sense: union operates on sets and sets have no order! –  onedaywhen Sep 15 '11 at 10:18
4  
@onedaywhen The original author wants to concatenate two ordered sets of results. UNION does not allow that to happen. There may be another construct to do it. There may not. Either way this answer doesn't technically accomplish what author was asking. –  Ian Boyd Sep 16 '11 at 13:36
2  
@Ian Boyd: In SQL, ORDER BY is part of a cursor, whereas UNION operates on tables, therefore their code cannot work. I cannot see how you can infer the OP's intention from absurd code. Consider that SQL's UNION removes duplicates: if these are your "ordered sets of results" {1, 2, 3} UNION {2, 4, 6} would the result be {1, 2, 3, 4, 6} or {1, 3, 2, 4, 6}? We don't know because union of "ordered sets of results" is undefined as regards SQL and the OP hasn't specified. –  onedaywhen Sep 16 '11 at 14:22
    
I am using MYSQL, I have included the field (Ordering field) in all the select statements. Then just added Order by by at the end, Works fine for me. –  CreativeManix Apr 26 at 13:10

Sometimes you need to have the ORDER BY in each of the sections that need to be combined with UNION.

In this case

SELECT * FROM 
(
  SELECT table1.field1 FROM table1 ORDER BY table1.field1
) DUMMY_ALIAS1

UNION ALL

SELECT * FROM
( 
  SELECT table2.field1 FROM table2 ORDER BY table2.field1
) DUMMY_ALIAS2
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1  
worked for me when the order by affects the result set (as when using Top x) –  James Barrass May 11 '11 at 14:56
    
This is exactly what I am looking for! Thanks! –  Srichand Yella Jun 25 '11 at 11:43
    
Still working (SQL 2008 R1), thanks for this. –  nimizen Dec 15 '11 at 15:42
    
Works great for me...you need to make sure that the outer select has a table alias. That bit me. –  Troy Apr 22 '12 at 7:56
1  
Not working in SQL 2012 –  Pradeep Sep 17 at 2:02

I think this does a good job of explaining.

The following is a UNION query that uses an ORDER BY clause:

select supplier_id, supplier_name
from suppliers
where supplier_id > 2000
UNION
select company_id, company_name
from companies
where company_id > 1000
ORDER BY 2;

Since the column names are different between the two "select" statements, it is more advantageous to reference the columns in the ORDER BY clause by their position in the result set. In this example, we've sorted the results by supplier_name / company_name in ascending order, as denoted by the "ORDER BY 2".

The supplier_name / company_name fields are in position #2 in the result set.

Taken from here: http://www.techonthenet.com/sql/union.php

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Here's an example from Northwind 2007:

SELECT [Product ID], [Order Date], [Company Name], [Transaction], [Quantity]
FROM [Product Orders]
UNION SELECT [Product ID], [Creation Date], [Company Name], [Transaction], [Quantity]
FROM [Product Purchases]
ORDER BY [Order Date] DESC;

The ORDER BY clause just needs to be the last statement, after you've done all your unioning. You can union several sets together, then put an ORDER BY clause after the last set.

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Using a concrete example:

SELECT name FROM Folders ORDER BY name
UNION
SELECT name FROM Files ORDER BY name

Files:

name
=============================
RTMS.exe
thiny1.etl
thing2.elt
f.txt
tcpdump_trial_license (1).zip

Folders:

name
============================
Contacts
Desktop
Downloads
Links
Favorites
My Documents

Desired Output: (results of first select first, i.e. folders first)

Contacts
Desktop
Downloads
Favorites
Links
My Documents
f.txt
RTMS.exe
tcpdump_trial_license (1).zip
thiny1.etl
thing2.elt

SQL to achieve the desired results:

SELECT name 
FROM (
    SELECT 1 AS rank, name FROM Folders
    UNION 
    SELECT 2 AS rank, name FROM Files) dt
ORDER BY rank, name
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(SELECT table1.field1 FROM table1 
UNION
SELECT table2.field1 FROM table2) ORDER BY field1 

Work? Remember think sets. Get the set you want using a union and then perform your operations on it.

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You can also use ordinal values in your order by clause in case the fields you wish to sort on are named differently –  Anson Smith Oct 17 '08 at 21:21
    
This is probably what the OP had in mind –  toddmo Jun 16 at 19:59
SELECT table1Column1 as col1,table1Column2 as col2
    FROM table1
UNION
(    SELECT table2Column1 as col1, table1Column2 as col2
         FROM table2
)
ORDER BY col1 ASC
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This is the stupidest thing I've ever seen, but it works, and you can't argue with results.

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT table1.field1 FROM table1 ORDER BY table1.field1
    UNION
    SELECT table2.field1 FROM table2 ORDER BY table2.field1
) derivedTable

The interior of the derived table will not execute on its own, but as a derived table works perfectly fine. I've tried this on SS 2000, SS 2005, SS 2008 R2, and all three work.

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SELECT field1
FROM ( SELECT field1 FROM table1
       UNION
       SELECT field1 FROM table2
     ) AS TBL
ORDER BY TBL.field1

(use ALIAS)

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@DisplacedGuy if MJ has a better answer to a question then then any of the above, and in this case the accepted answer clearly has problems, then MJ should be able to and I encourage him to leave new answers –  MobileMon Nov 20 '13 at 21:14
    
And btw, MJ's answer is best! (for me at least) –  MobileMon Nov 20 '13 at 21:17

This is how it is done

select * from 
    (select top 100 percent pointx, pointy from point
     where pointtype = 1
     order by pointy) A
union all
select * from 
    (select top 100 percent pointx, pointy from point
     where pointtype = 2
     order by pointy desc) B
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By using order separately each subset gets order, but not the whole set, which is what you would want uniting two tables.

You should use something like this to have one ordered set:

SELECT TOP (100) PERCENT field1, field2, field3, field4, field5 FROM 
(SELECT table1.field1, table1.field2, table1.field3, table1.field4, table1.field5 FROM table1
UNION ALL 
SELECT table2.field1, table2.field2, table2.field3, table2.field4, table2.field5 FROM  table2) 
AS unitedTables ORDER BY field5 DESC
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The second table cannot include the table name in the ORDER BY clause.

So...

SELECT table1.field1 FROM table1 ORDER BY table1.field1
UNION
SELECT table2.field1 FROM table2 ORDER BY field1

Does not throw an exception

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What a good question this was. Can you tell whether your version, or the nested one, return the desired results? Or, do they both return the same results? If so, would the (other guy's) nested solution be more performant because it only does ORDER BY once? –  DOK Oct 17 '08 at 21:15
    
I'm not sure the performance benefit on the Jet engine, but I would say the readability is increased due to the nesting. –  Curtis Inderwiesche Oct 17 '08 at 21:53

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