Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I discovered a strange behaviour of my program and after futher analysis, I was able to find that there is probably something wrong either in my C# knowledge or somewhere else. I beleive it's my mistake but I cannot find an answer anywhere...

public class B
{
    public static implicit operator B(A values) 
    {
        return null; 
    }
}
public class A { }

public class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A a = new A();
        B b = a ?? new B();
        //b = null ... is it wrong that I expect b to be B() ?
    }
}

The variable "b" in this code is evaluated to null. I don't get why is it null.

I googled and found a response in this question - Implicit casting of Null-Coalescing operator result - with the official specification.

But following this specification, I can't find the reason why "b" is null :( Maybe I'm reading it wrong in which case I apologize for spamming.

If A exists and is not a nullable type or a reference type, a compile-time error occurs.

...that's not the case.

If b is a dynamic expression, the result type is dynamic. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is converted to dynamic, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated, and this becomes the result.

...that's also not the case.

Otherwise, if A exists and is a nullable type and an implicit conversion exists from b to A0, the result type is A0. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is unwrapped to type A0, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and converted to type A0, and this becomes the result.

...A exists, implicit conversion from b to A0 does not exist.

Otherwise, if A exists and an implicit conversion exists from b to A, the result type is A. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and converted to type A, and this becomes the result.

...A exists, implicit conversion from b to A does not exist.

Otherwise, if b has a type B and an implicit conversion exists from a to B, the result type is B. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is unwrapped to type A0 (if A exists and is nullable) and converted to type B, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and becomes the result.

...b has a type B and implicit conversion exists from a to B. a is evaluated into null. Therefore, b should be evaluated and b should be the result.

Otherwise, a and b are incompatible, and a compile-time error occurs. Does not happen

Am I missing something please?

share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't the operator be overridden to work? – Rand Random Jan 27 '14 at 17:28
    
Very interesting. Note that if you change the last line to B b = (B)a ?? new B();, i.e. you write the implicit cast "explicitly" in the code, that makes a difference. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 27 '14 at 17:43
    
@JeppeStigNielsen You're forcing the conversion to take place before the null check, not after, by doing that. – Servy Jan 27 '14 at 17:45
    
@Servy Exactly. I found out and wrote in my answer. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 27 '14 at 17:59
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, the specification says (I change to x and y for less confusion here):

• Otherwise, if y has a type Y and an implicit conversion exists from x to Y, the result type is Y. At run-time, x is first evaluated. If x is not null, x is unwrapped to type X0 (if X exists and is nullable) and converted to type Y, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, y is evaluated and becomes the result.

This happens. First, the left-hand side x, which is just a, is checked for null. But it is not null in itself. Then the left-hand side is to be used. The implicit conversion is then run. Its result of type B is ... null.

Note that this is different from:

    A a = new A();
    B b = (B)a ?? new B();

In this case the left operand is an expression (x) which is null in itself, and the result becomes the right-hand side (y).

Maybe implicit conversions between reference types should return null (if and) only if the original is null, as a good practice?


I guess the guys who wrote the spec could have done it like this (but did not):

• Otherwise, if y has a type Y and an implicit conversion exists from x to Y, the result type is Y. At run-time, x is first evaluated and converted to type Y. If the output of that conversion is not null, that output becomes the result. Otherwise, y is evaluated and becomes the result.

Maybe that would have been more intuitive? It would have forced the runtime to call your implicit conversion no matter if the input to the conversion were null or not. That should not be too expensive if typical implementations quickly determined that null → null.

share|improve this answer
    
It hit me after reading your reply, thanks! – Motig Jan 27 '14 at 20:07

Why did you expect the null-coalescing operator to return new B()? a is not null, so a ?? new B() evaluates to a.

Now that we know that a will be returned, we need to determine the type of the result (T) and whether we need to cast a to T.

• Otherwise, if b has a type B and an implicit conversion exists from a to B, the result type is B. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is unwrapped to type A0 (if A exists and is nullable) and converted to type B, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and becomes the result.

An implicit conversion exists from A to B, so B is the result type of the expression. Which means a will be implicitly casted to B. And your implicit operator returns null.

In fact, if you write var b = a ?? new B(); (notice the var), you'll see that the compiler infers B to be the type returned by the expression.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't explain why changing the declaration to object b still produces null. – Kendall Frey Jan 27 '14 at 17:33
2  
@KendallFrey Close enough to it. The ?? only works if the first and second operands resolve to the same type (or the nullable and non-nullable versions of a type). The first operand, a, is compared to null, and then converted to be of type B, at which point the implicit conversion turns it to null. It doesn't need to be assigned to anything at all for this to happen. – Servy Jan 27 '14 at 17:44
    
@KendallFrey good point, I've updated my answer. – dcastro Jan 27 '14 at 17:46
    
The rules that are quoted in the question itself, for the ?? operator, are more relevant (and more complex) than the rules you quote (through Lipperts blog) for the ternary ?: operator. For example given the variables bool b = false; short? s = 10; int i = 10; the expression s ?? i is allowed, whereas b ? s : i does not compile. This answer was first, but other answers are more precise, in my opinion. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 27 '14 at 18:20
    
@JeppeStigNielsen nice catch! I usually refer to that blog post whenever discussing both the ternary and the null-coalescing operators - I tend to forget that those rules apply to the ternary operator only (even though both sets of rules are very similar). I've updated my answer. – dcastro Jan 27 '14 at 19:17

Otherwise, if b has a type B and an implicit conversion exists from a to B, the result type is B. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is unwrapped to type A0 (if A exists and is nullable) and converted to type B, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and becomes the result.

...b has a type B and implicit conversion exists from a to B. a is evaluated into null. Therefore, b should be evaluated and b should be the result.

You're interpreting this one wrong. Nothing says that a to B conversion is done before null check is performed. It states that null check is done before the conversion!

Your case fits to that:

If a is not null, a is unwrapped to type A0 (if A exists and is nullable) and converted to type B, and this becomes the result.

share|improve this answer

The part we need to look at is the compile-time type of the null-coalescing expression.

Otherwise, if b has a type B and an implicit conversion exists from a to B, the result type is B. At run-time, a is first evaluated. If a is not null, a is unwrapped to type A0 (if A exists and is nullable) and converted to type B, and this becomes the result. Otherwise, b is evaluated and becomes the result.

To put this into pseudocode:

public Tuple<Type, object> NullCoalesce<TA, TB>(TA a, TB b)
{
    ...
    else if (a is TB) // pseudocode alert, this won't work in actual C#
    {
        Type type = typeof(TB);
        object result;
        if (a != null)
        {
            result = (TB)a; // in your example, this resolves to null
        }
        else
        {
            result = b;
        }
        return new Tuple<Type, object>(type, result);
    }
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.