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I tried checking for null but the compiler warns that this condition will never occur. What should I be looking for?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Assuming you want to get the value if the key does exist, use Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.TryGetValue:

int value;
if (dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out value))
{
    // Key was in dictionary; "value" contains corresponding value
} 
else 
{
    // Key wasn't in dictionary; "value" is now 0
}

(Using ContainsKey and then the the indexer makes it look the key up twice, which is pretty pointless.)

Note that even if you were using reference types, checking for null wouldn't work - the indexer for Dictionary<,> will throw an exception if you request a missing key, rather than returning null. (This is a big difference between Dictionary<,> and Hashtable.)

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@JonSkeet Isn't TryGetValue doing a double lookup too (as stated in this question body)? –  nawfal Dec 2 '12 at 14:59
1  
@nawfal: I see no indication that that question states that at all. It says it's doing more work than ContainsKey, which is true, because it has to extract the value as well. It's not doing two lookups though. –  Jon Skeet Dec 2 '12 at 17:56

If you're just checking before trying to add a new value, use the ContainsKey method:

if (!openWith.ContainsKey("ht"))
{
    openWith.Add("ht", "hypertrm.exe");
}

If you're checking that the value exists, use the TryGetValue method as described in Jon Skeet's answer.

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4  
TryGet is better –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 26 '10 at 11:21
2  
Coz you're resolving the key lookup through the hashtable twice if you immediately Get after the Contains. Wintellect PowerCollections also has GetValueElseAdd methods which you give a value (or a Func<TValue>) to also save the resolution on the Insert if you're going to add if its not there. I guess the reason that hasnt made it into the .NET libs is because the Add path is less frequent if you're using it in a cache stylee] –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 26 '10 at 11:23
    
@rub: I guess that depends on the purpose of the code. If you want to use the value I agree that TryGetValue would be better, but if you want to check if the dictionary contains the key in order to avoid duplicate additions, I would say ContainsKey is just as good (if not better). –  Fredrik Mörk Jan 26 '10 at 11:25
    
@Fredrik: If you only want to do a containment check, then yes, it's worth using ContainsKey. Note that that's not the case in the sample code of this answer. –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '10 at 11:27
    
@Jon: true, I actually missed that the added value was fetched immediately after it was added. –  Fredrik Mörk Jan 26 '10 at 11:29

The Dictionary throws a KeyNotFound exception in the event that the dictionary does not contain your key.

As suggested, ContainsKey is the appropriate precaution. TryGetValue is also effective.

This allows the dictionary to store a value of null more effectively. Without it behaving this way, checking for a null result from the [] operator would indicate either a null value OR the non-existance of the input key which is no good.

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Additional information can be found at MSDN: msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/9tee9ht2.aspx –  cyberzed Jan 26 '10 at 11:23

You should check for Dictionary.ContainsKey(int key) before trying to pull out the value.

Dictionary<int, int> myDictionary = new Dictionary<int, int>();
myDictionary.Add(2,4);
myDictionary.Add(3,5);

int keyToFind = 7;
if(myDictionary.ContainsKey(keyToFind))
{
    myValueLookup = myDictionay[keyToFind];
    // do work...
}
else
{
    // the key doesn't exist.
}
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1  
Why do you want to make it do the lookup twice? –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '10 at 11:22
1  
@Jon because it usually reads better –  mookid8000 Jan 26 '10 at 11:24
1  
@mookid: Not in my opinion. The idea is to try to look up the key, and take one course of action if it's found, and another course of action otherwise, right? –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '10 at 11:26
2  
@Jon - Honestly? Because I didn't know about TryGetValue. Thankfully, I do now, so I'll know in future. I'm going to leave this answer intact, though 'cos discussion is valuable. –  ZombieSheep Jan 26 '10 at 11:49
1  
@ZombieSheep: Fair enough. Isn't SO great for learning? :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '10 at 11:56

ContainsKey is what you're looking for.

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You should probably use:

if(myDictionary.ContainsKey(someInt))
{
  // do something
}

The reason why you can't check for null is that the key here is a value type.

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The type of the value is somewhat irrelevant, as checking for null wouldn't have the desired effect. –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '10 at 11:24
    
@Johannes, Jon's solution is of course way better, but the asker did state that he checked if the key exists, and it is a Dictionary<int, int>, so the key is also a value type here. –  Razzie Jan 26 '10 at 13:03

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