Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a configuration file to which I want to add a string, that looks e.g. like that:

line1
line2
line3
line4

The new string should not be appended but written somewhere into the middle of the file. Therefore I am looking for a specific position (or string) in the file and when it has been found, I insert my new string:

file = File.open(path,"r+")
while (!file.eof?)
  line = file.readline
  if (line.downcase.starts_with?("line1"))
    file.write("Some nice little sentence")
  end
end

The problem is that Ruby overwrites the line in that position with the new text, so the result is the following:

line1
Some nice little sentence
line3
line4

What I want is a "real" insertion:

line1
Some nice little sentence
line2
line3
line4

How can this be achieved?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If it's a small file I think the easiest way would be to:

  • Read the complete file.
  • Insert the line.
  • Write the new file.

That is the way Rails does it behind the scenes.

Or you can copy it line by line and then overwrite the original with mv like this:

require 'fileutils'

tempfile=File.open("file.tmp", 'w')
f=File.new("file.txt")
f.each do |line|
  tempfile<<line
  if line.downcase=~/^line2/
    tempfile << "Some nice little sentence\n"
  end
end
f.close
tempfile.close

FileUtils.mv("file.tmp", "file.txt")
share|improve this answer
add comment
def replace(filepath, regexp, *args, &block)
  content = File.read(filepath).gsub(regexp, *args, &block)
  File.open(filepath, 'wb') { |file| file.write(content) }
end


replace(my_file, /^line2/mi) { |match| "Some nice little sentence"}

line1
Some nice little sentence
line2
line3
line4

and if you want to append to the existing...

replace(my_file, /^line2/mi) do |match| 
  "#{match} Some nice little sentence"
end

line1
line2 Some nice little sentence
line2
line3
line4
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sure you noticed you printed line2 two times in the last example. –  Magne May 19 at 18:44
add comment

A couple other options:

file = File.read(path).sub(/line2\n/, 'Some nice little sentence\n\1')
File.write(path, file)

file = File.readlines(path)
index = file.index("line2")
file.insert(index, "Some nice little sentence")
File.write(path, file)
share|improve this answer
    
I tried to use this, but File.write(path, 'w') overwrites the file with the single character w - what's the correct approach? –  dgmstuart Sep 10 '13 at 22:25
add comment

The easiest way is to read the whole file in memory, then write the first part back to the file, write your inserted line to the file, and write the remaining part back to the file. This should be relatively simple to do when you read the file as an array of lines, but you might run into problems if your file is very large since you have to read the entire file into memory with this approach.

Alternatively you could find the spot that you want to insert the line, read the lines after that point into memory, seek back to that point in the file, write your new line to the file, and finally write the remaining lines to the file. Again you'll run into problems if the remainder of the file is very large since you have to read it all into memory.

A third approach is to write the first part into a new file, write the inserted line into a new file, write the remainder of the original file into the new file, and finally replace the old file with the new file on the file system. This approach allows you to deal with one line at a time so you can handle files that do not fit into memory.

The reason why file writing works like this is because the file is like a fixed size array of bytes: when you write a byte to the file you will overwrite an existing byte (I'm ignoring the case where you append to a file here). So the only way to insert anything to a file is to first move the old content to a new location by reading it from the old location and writing it to the new location. After that you can 'insert' data into the now vacant area.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.