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First off, I apologize for the ignorance. I'm pretty baby faced when it comes to JavaScript, mainly coming from a Java background, so quite a bit of this is new to me. I've read a few posts, but honestly, I'm not sure of even a good question to ask.

I've been following "Single Page Web Applications: JavaScript End-To-End" and now I'm going back through the code and trying to reconstruct/refactor it so it makes sense to me.

One thing I'd like to understand is how to properly organize code using the Modular pattern the author references.

spa.model = (function () {
    var people,
        stateMap = { id : 1 };

    people = (function () {
        var methods1, method2;

        method1 = function(){ … }; // do something
        method2 = function(){ … }; // do something 

        return {
            method1 : method1,
            method2 : method2
        };
    }());

    return {
        people : people
    };

}());

This allows me to call something like spa.model.people.method1();

What I'd like to do is somehow move the people var to another file so that it looks something like this

spa.model = (function () {
    var people = spa.model.people,
        stateMap = { id : 1 };

    return {
        people : people
    };

}());

spa.model.people = (function () {
    var method, method2;

    method1 = function() { return stateMap.id; },
    method2 = ... ;

    return {
        method1 : method1,
        method2 : method2
    };

}());

However, when I refactor code out like this I get all kinds of scope errors. For example, I can no longer reference stateMap from spa.model.people.

How are larger files organized when using this pattern? Even with only two objects (people & chat), the authors' spa.model file is getting rather large. Imagine having 20 database objects to model. That'd be a huge file.

share|improve this question
    
You could pass the stateMap into the spa.model.people function as an argument. –  Brian Glaz Jan 27 at 21:40
    
Is stateMap variable public property for spa.model object? Than @BrianGlaz suggestion is correct. –  CodeGroover Jan 27 at 23:33
    
stateMap is actually private. Based on this pattern, only those items listed in the return block are publicly available. –  Will Lovett Jan 28 at 16:08
    
@WillLovett Are you ok with spa().model().person().method1() chain? At that case you will be benefit from lazy pointers. –  CodeGroover Jan 29 at 10:54
    
The stateMap is an extension of the module pattern that helps one easily determine the shared state variables across the module. When debugging at a breakpoint, for example, inspecting stateMap is especially useful. If we are sharing entire stateMaps between modules then we probably have failed to create minimal API to accomplish a required task, and almost certainly could do a better job of data and logic encapsulation. –  Michael Mikowski Feb 7 at 1:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

IMO, the best way to do this is to create a parent ("model") and subordinate modules like model.people, model.auth, and model.chat. The parent ("model") manages and coordinates shared state and configurations. The subordinate modules (model.people, model.auth, model.chat) should not call each other or otherwise depend on the other's existence.

Here is an example where the model coordinates 3 subordinate modules interface (model.people, model.chat, model.auth) and stores shared state in its stateMap. Recognize that each subordinate module will have its own encapsulated stateMap which will not pollute the parent state. While this example is certainly not complete, hopefully it helps point the way.

model = (function () {
  var 
    __undef,
    configMap = {};
    stateMap  = { 
      user_id   : __undef,
      chatee_id : __undef
    },

    logIn, addPerson, rmPerson, callPerson, hangUp;

  logIn = function ( user_name, passwd_str ) {
    user_id = model.auth( user_name, passwd_str );
    if ( user_id ) {
      model.people.addPerson( user_id ):
      model.chat.announceUser( user_id );
      stateMap.user_id = user_id;
    } 
  };

  // ... and more methods that coordinate subordinate modules

  return { 
    logIn      : logIn,
    addPerson  : addPerson,
    rmPerson   : rmPerson,
    callPerson : callPerson,
    hangUp     : hangUp
  };
}());

This stuff is not always easy. I try not to get too hung up about organization but keep it in mind. It's kind of like project management: the only "perfect" project plan I've ever seen was written after the project was complete. The same is true for code organization. In my first pass, I allow myself to be a little sloppy. For example, I might violate the no-peer-cross-talk rule as a quick hack - but I will add a big fat TODO to ensure it doesn't make it to production code.

Once our code gets settled, I then give it another pass and clean up the loose ends - like the aforementioned big fat TODOs. The result is usually well organized, easy to understand, and maintainable code. If not, I rinse and repeat.

I hope that help!

share|improve this answer
1  
@will-lovett is this helpful or are you looking for something different? Please just let me know. –  Michael Mikowski Feb 3 at 4:54
    
Sorry for the late update. Yes, I think that's what I'm looking for and the direction I would probably have gone. I'll still need to look at accessing the parent statemap from the child class (ie people -> model.stateMap() ) but I think this is the right track. –  Will Lovett Feb 26 at 17:13
    
Thanks for the update. I appreciate it, and good luck. –  Michael Mikowski Mar 1 at 0:55

I like to declare my objects a bit differently. Perhaps you could do something like this:

(function () {

  spa.model = {

    stateMap: {
      id: 1
    },

  };


  var people = {

    method1: function() {
      return stateMap.id;
    },

    method2: function(){},
  };

  spa.model.people = people; 

  // obviously expose spa at the end.
  window.spa = spa;

}());
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this pollute the global namespace though? Now people could be referenced anywhere by anyone, correct? People is supposed to be a public property of spa.model only, but we'd have an extra people var floating around. –  Will Lovett Jan 28 at 16:24
    
Nah - I always wrap my entire file in a self-executing function, which prevents that - I took that part for granted in my example, but ill update it. –  dc2 Jan 28 at 21:28

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