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Hey I have these two methods:

private void sendMessage(String message) {
    ArrayList<Client> waiters = this.getPlayers().getWaitingRoom();
    for (Client c : waiters) {
        c.sendMessage(message);
    }
}   

second method:

private void sendMessage(String message) {
    ArrayList<Client> players = this.getPlayers().getGame();
    for (Client c : players) {
        c.sendMessage(message);
    }
}

These methods are useful because I need somehow to send a message to the clients that are in the waiting room and the clients that are in game, the clients who are in game should not hear the messages that I send for the ones in the waiting room, same for opposite.

I came up with this solution to make it into one method but I feel that's its a very poor solution:

private void sendMessage(String message, int type) {
    ArrayList<Client> clients = (type == 0) ? this.getPlayers().getWaitingRoom() :
        this.getPlayers().getGame();
    for (Client c :clients) {
        c.sendMessage(message);
    }
}

This works, but I wondered if there is a proper solution for this, more object oriented. But since it is using the same type (ArrayList), I got a bit confused & lost.

Any ideas of a better design for this method?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The first, obvious generalization would be to declare

private void sendMessage(String message, Iterable<? extends Client> clients) {
    for (Client c : clients) {
        c.sendMessage(message);
    }
}   

That allows calling

sendMessage("Message", this.getPlayers().getWaitingRoom());
sendMessage("Message", this.getPlayers().getGame());

BTW: Though the explicit declaration of ArrayList is usually not necessary. They could return List<Client>....

EDIT: Answering the question "Why Iterable...":

Iterable is the "smallest" interface that is sufficient for the task that you want to do in this method. You ONLY want to iterate over all elements. You don't need an ArrayList. You don't need a List. You don't even need a Collection. You ONLY need something that is Iterable.

The advantage is that this method may be called with many different arguments:

Set<Client> set = ...
List<Client> list = ...
Queue<Client> queue = ...
sendMessage("Message", set); // Works
sendMessage("Message", list); // Works
sendMessage("Message", queue ); // Works

Set<SomeClassExtendingClient> setWithSpecialClients = ...
sendMessage("Message", setWithSpecialClients); // Works as well...

If you declared the method to receive an ArrayList<Client>, you could not pass in a LinkedList<Client>, or an ArrayList<SpecialClient>. With Iterable<? extends Client>, you have the greatest possible flexibility.

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Ah I see, but why Iterable ? extends Client? –  Ben Beri Jan 27 at 21:44
    
Added an edit with an explaination –  Marco13 Jan 27 at 21:50
    
So basically Iterable is anything that is Iterable like List, ArrayList, Set, Queue, etc right? Because these are implementing Iterable? Also why <? extends Client? so it will accept any object that extends Client? –  Ben Beri Jan 27 at 21:53
    
See the edit: Yes, Iterable<? extends Client> allows all these kinds of collections, because they all implement this interface. And due to the <? extends Client>, they may contain arbitrary subclasses of 'Client'. You should probably read some tutorials about interfaces. You'll never want to live without them any more :D –  Marco13 Jan 27 at 21:55
    
Yeah I had one problem that I used interfaces, where I have a player and a npc and then I needed to make a npc called AttackVictim<Victim> and then make the variables AttackVictim<NPC> attackNpc = new AttackNpc(); AttackVictim<Player> attackPlayer = new AttackPlayer() which extends AttackVictim pretty useful but confusing to get a good design with them lol, Thanks btw –  Ben Beri Jan 27 at 21:58

You are defining the wrong input for the method. The method's task is to send a message to a list of clients. It should neither care nor know about the deeper meaning of those clients. So what it should look like is this:

private void sendMessageToClients(String message, ArrayList<Client> clients) {
    for (Client c :clients) {
        c.sendMessage(message);
    }
}

The task to determine whether you choose the waiting room or the ingame players is to be done by the caller of the method.

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Marco13's answer is even better of course, because the exact type of the collection of clients the method sends a message to is irrelevant to its logic as well. It could do the same thing with a LinkedList of clients, or some other List. Iterable is the most abstract type of things that you can run over in a for-each loop, so that's your most abstract and flexible solution to the method. –  user3237736 Jan 27 at 21:50

Java enums are designed in an object orientated way. Using an enum would make your code type-safe.

public enum Room {
    GAME, LOBBY;
}

private void sendMessage(String message, Room room) {
    ArrayList<Client> clients = (room == Room.LOBBY) ? this.getPlayers().getWaitingRoom() :
        this.getPlayers().getGame();
    for (Client c :clients) {
        c.sendMessage(message);
    }
}

Note: If you were to have more than two possibilities, you would use a switch statement.

Edit: The other answers would be the preferred solution; this is just another option.

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