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The memory leak caused by the line indicated. "pendingSendReqs.push_back(&f);" in the sendreq() method. I am new to c++ so I can't seem to figure out why the memory leak is occuring. The size of memory leaked is 16 bytes.

class Station {
    struct Frame {
        enum { Token, Data, Ack } type;                  // type of frame
        unsigned int src;                                // source id
        unsigned int dst;                                // destination id
        unsigned int prio;                               // priority
    } frame;

    unsigned int stnId;
    static unsigned int requests;                        // total send requests (if needed)
    void data( Frame frame );                            // pass frame
    void main();                                         // coroutine main
    Station *nextStation;
    vector<Frame*> pendingSendReqs;
  public:
    Station( unsigned int id ) : stnId(id) { }
    ~Station() {
        for (int i = 0; i < pendingSendReqs.size(); i++) {
            delete pendingSendReqs.at(i);
            cout << "~: " << pendingSendReqs.at(i) << endl;
        }
    }
    //unsigned int getId() { return stnId; }
    void setup( Station *nexthop ) {                     // supply next hop
        //*nexthop is the object
        nextStation = nexthop;
        //cout << "size: " << sizeof(*nexthop) << endl;
    }
    void sendreq( unsigned int round, unsigned int dst, unsigned int prio ) { // store send request
        Frame f;
        f.type = Frame::Data;
        f.src = stnId;
        f.dst = dst;
        f.prio = prio;


        pendingSendReqs.push_back(&f); //MEMORY LEAK CAUSED BY THIS LINE
    }
    void start();                                        // inject token and start
};
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5  
There's no vector of structs in the code. –  user529758 Jan 27 at 21:55
    
Just use a vector<Frame>. No need for pointers. As is, this is a concern: stackoverflow.com/questions/6441218/… –  chris Jan 27 at 21:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're storing pointers to local variables, which will automatically get destroyed, inside the vector. This is illegal.

 vector<Frame*> pendingSendReqs;
 // this is a vector of pointers to struct and not a vector of structs

void sendreq( unsigned int round, unsigned int dst, unsigned int prio ) {
    Frame f;     // this automatic variable will get destroyed when sendreq returns
    f.type = Frame::Data;
    f.src = stnId;
    f.dst = dst;
    f.prio = prio;


    pendingSendReqs.push_back(&f); //MEMORY LEAK CAUSED BY THIS LINE
    // because you're going to hold on to this address which will mean
    // nothing when this function returns
}

The way you intend to do it is:

vector<Frame> pendingSendReqs;

and inside sendreq:

pendingSendReqs.push_back(f); // store the object's copy instead of it's address so that it outlives the life of this local
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Did you remove delete pendingSendReqs.at(i); after switching to storing objects instead of pointers? The vector's destructor will automatically destroy them for you, so you don't've to manually call delete on what you didn't allocate using new. In fact, since it's the only thing you're doing inside ~Station() you can get rid of the destructor altogether. –  legends2k Jan 27 at 22:27

This is not a memory leak

pendingSendReqs.push_back(&f); 

it is future undefined behaviour. You are storing the address of a local variable. Any attempt to de-reference one of those pointers outside of the scope of the function is undefined behaviour.

You have to ask yourself whether you really need a vector of pointers. If you don't know the answer to that, it is likely that you don't.

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when

void sendreq( unsigned int round, unsigned int dst, unsigned int prio )

ends,

your vector pendingSendReqs will contain pointers to variables that have been eliminated ( because are local variable ), and will contain garbage, and will give you a crash.

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