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Consider the class Foo.

public class Foo {
    private double size;

    public double getSize() {
        return this.size; // Always O(1)
    }
}

Foo has a property called size, which is frequently accessed, but never modified, by a given method. I've always cached a property in a variable whenever it is accessed more than once in any method, because "someone told me so" without giving it much thought. i.e.

public void test(Foo foo) {
    double size = foo.getSize(); // Cache it or not?
    // size will be referenced in several places later on.
}

Is this worth it, or an overkill?

If I don't cache it, are modern compilers smart enough to cache it themselves?

share|improve this question
2  
When I do it, I do it for readability, not performance. – yshavit Jan 27 '14 at 22:00
    
depends on complexity of your implementation of size() method,for example in the case of ArrayList or String it is O(1), so its not worth it to cache – Jigar Joshi Jan 27 '14 at 22:01
2  
Just change double size = foo.getSize(); to double fooSize = foo.getSize();. – Bhesh Gurung Jan 27 '14 at 22:05
up vote 15 down vote accepted
+50

A couple of factors (in no particular order) that I consider when deciding whether or not to store the value returned by a call to a "get() method":

  1. Performance of the get() method - Unless the API specifies, or unless the calling code is tightly coupled with the called method, there are no guarantees of the performance of the get() method. The code may be fine in testing now, but may get worse if the get() methods performace changes in the future or if testing does not reflect real-world conditions. (e.g. testing with only a thousand objects in a container when a real-world container might have ten million) Used in a for-loop, the get() method will be called before every iteration

  2. Readability - A variable can be given a specific and descriptive name, providing clarification of its use and/or meaning in a way that may not be clear from inline calls to the get() method. Don't underestimate the value of this to those reviewing and maintaining the code.

  3. Thread safety - Can the value returned by the get() method potentially change if another thread modifies the object while the calling method is doing its thing? Should such a change be reflected in the calling method's behavior?

Regarding the question of whether or not compilers will cache it themselves, I'm going to speculate and say that in most cases the answer has to be 'no'. The only way the compiler could safely do so would be if it could determine that the get() method would return the same value at every invocation. And this could only be guaranteed if the get() method itself was marked final and all it did was return a constant (i.e an object or primitive also marked 'final'). I'm not sure but I think this is probably not a scenario the compiler bothers with. The JIT compiler has more information and thus could have more flexibility but you have no guarantees that some method will get JIT'ed.

In conclusion, don't worry about what the compiler might do. Caching the return value of a get() method is probably the right thing to do most of the time, and will rarely (i.e almost never) be the wrong thing to do. Favor writing code that is readable and correct over code that is fast(est) and flashy.

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1  
Normally it is a good practice to cache on stack. Recursive calls will consume more memory on stack and it might be an issue for very specific cases but deep recursion itself should be avoided to avoid "stack overflow" errors. – jbaliuka Feb 5 '14 at 19:42

I don't know whether there is a "right" answer, but I would keep a local copy.

In your example, I can see that getSize() is trivial, but in real code, I don't always know whether it is trivial or not; and even if it is trivial today, I don't know that somebody won't come along and change the getSize() method to make it non-trivial sometime in the future.

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The biggest factor would be performance. If it's a simple operation that doesn't require a whole lot of CPU cycles, I'd say don't cache it. But if you constantly need to execute an expensive operation on data that doesn't change, then definitely cache it. For example, in my app the currently logged in user is serialized on every page in JSON format, the serialization operation is pretty expensive, so in order to improve performance I now serialize the user once when he signs in and then use the serialized version for putting JSON on the page. Here is before and after, made a noticeable improvement in performance:

//Before

public User(Principal principal) {
    super(principal.getUsername(), principal.getPassword(), principal.getAuthorities());
    uuid            = principal.getUuid();
    id              = principal.getId();
    name            = principal.getName();
    isGymAdmin      = hasAnyRole(Role.ROLE_ADMIN);
    isCustomBranding= hasAnyRole(Role.ROLE_CUSTOM_BRANDING);
    locations.addAll(principal.getLocations());
}
public String toJson() {
    **return JSONAdapter.getGenericSerializer().serialize(this);**
}

// After

public User(Principal principal) {
    super(principal.getUsername(), principal.getPassword(), principal.getAuthorities());
    uuid            = principal.getUuid();
    id              = principal.getId();
    name            = principal.getName();
    isGymAdmin      = hasAnyRole(Role.ROLE_ADMIN);
    isCustomBranding= hasAnyRole(Role.ROLE_CUSTOM_BRANDING);
    locations.addAll(principal.getLocations());
    **json = JSONAdapter.getGenericSerializer().serialize(this);**
}
public String toJson() {
    return json;
}

The User object has no setter methods, there is no way the data would ever change unless the user signs out and then back in, so in this case I'd say it is safe to cache the value.

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If the value of size was calculated each time say by looping through an array and thus not O(1), caching the value would have obvious benefits performance-wise. However since size of Foo is not expected to change at any point and it is O(1), caching the value mainly aids in readability. I recommend continuing to cache the value simply because readability is often times more of a concern than performance in modern computing systems.

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IMO, if you are really worried about performance this is a bit overkill or extensive but there is a couple of ways to ensure that the variable is "cached" by your VM,

First, you can create final static variables of the results (as per your example 1 or 0), hence only one copy is stored for the whole class, then your local variable is only a boolean (using only 1 bit), but still maintaining the result value of double (also, maybe you can use int, if it is only 0 or 1)

private static final double D_ZERO = 0.0;
private static final double D_ONE = 1.0;

private boolean ZERO = false;

public double getSize(){
    return (ZERO ? D_ZERO : D_ONE);
}

Or if you are able to set the size on initialization of the class you can go with this, you can set the final variable through constructor, and static, but since this is a local variable you can go with the constructor:

private final int SIZE;
public foo(){
    SIZE = 0;
}

public double getSize(){
    return this.SIZE;
}

this can be accessed via foo.getSize()

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In my code, i would cache it if either the getSize() method is time consuming or - and that is more often - the result is used in more or less complex expressions.

For example if calculating an offset from the size

int offset = fooSize * count1 + fooSize * count2;

is easier to read (for me) than

int offset = foo.getSize() * count1 + foo.getSize() * count2;
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