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Consider I have several enums similar to the below:

enum FooA {
    THREE(3), FOUR(4), SEVERN(7);

    private int x;

    private Foo(int x) {
        this.x = x;
    }
}

enum FooB {
    EIGHT(8), ONE(1), TEN(10);

    private int x;

    private Foo(int x) {
        this.x = x;
    }
}

If I wanted to add a method which returns x in every enum, should I:

  • Add the method in to every enum?
  • Create an abstract class which holds x and already has the getX method implemented.
  • Create an interface which holds a getX method and implement it for every enum?

The reason I ask this is because it seems to me as if using an abstract class or interface is over-doing it, especially if it's just for a single getter.

share|improve this question
    
First, maybe spell SEVEN correctly? Second, how long is a piece of string?? If your enum classes implement an interface then methods can use them interchangeably. Adding the method in every enum is essentially the same as the interface with the advantage of abstraction. As far as the abstract class goes, I have no idea what you mean here. – Boris the Spider Jan 27 '14 at 22:18
    
I think @Someone wants to create an abstract class that defines the method, and then have the enums extends that abstract class. However, that isn't possible in Java. See, for example: stackoverflow.com/a/15450935/636009 – David Conrad Jan 27 '14 at 22:22
    
@BoristheSpider First, the spelling of SEVERN is orthogonal to the question so please stay on topic. Second, the advantage of using an interface is not abstraction but polymorphism. I'm not surprised you don't know what an abstract class is either. – Mike B Jan 27 '14 at 22:27
    
@MikeB fair enough on the spelling. My point was that I don't see any way of combining an abstract class with an enum; I think the OP has some sort of utility class in mind but I'm not sure. As far as abstraction and polymorphism; they go hand in hand. – Boris the Spider Jan 27 '14 at 22:31
    
@BoristheSpider The terms abstraction and polymorphism are not interchangeable and using an interface in this instance doesn't abstract anything. Stackoverflow is a place to learn and teach, not to condescend and belittle. – Mike B Jan 27 '14 at 22:35

If I wanted to add a method which returns x in every enum, should I:

Add the method in to every enum?

Maybe, let's consider the other two options first.

Create an abstract class which holds x and already has the getX method implemented.

If you mean to try something like enum FooA extends AbstractFoo then I'm afraid you're out of luck. All enums in Java extend the Enum class implicitly. A class in Java can extend at most one class, so this option is out.

Create an interface which holds a getX method and implement it for every enum?

This is a possibility but you run in to a couple problems. You can add variable x to an interface, but it's going to be static and you have to initialize it in the interface so it isn't very useful here.

This might still be the correct solution (without adding x to the interface, just the getX() method) if you want to be able to use both Foo enum types interchangeably, but you wouldn't get any DRY benefits from it.

So the conclusion to me at least is that you'll have to add the methods to each enum, and you might want to use an interface.

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