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I'm having this issue where the rand num generated doesn't increase the way I'd like it to. I've tried multiple ways to increase the value if the user enters -1 or decrease the value is the user enters 1. If user enters -1 the projected output, x, should increase between the first output and the upper bound values and if the user enters 1 it should find one between the first output and the lower bound values. A portion of my code is below. Any help is appreciated.

I've tried with no luck:

i = x (rand() % (upper + lower));
x = i +1;

Portion of code:

switch(input)
{
case -1:
{
x = x+1+ (rand() % (upper-x-1));
printf("My guess is %d \n", x);
break;
}

case 0:
{
printf("I win\n");
break;
}

case 1:
{
x = (rand() % (upper+lower)) +lower;
printf("My guess is %d \n", x);
break;
}
default: printf("Wrong choice try again\n");
break;

EDIT: Changed the -1 case but it adds 4 then increments by 1 and stops at 55 which is correct but I cannot figure out the skipping of 4. I'm trying another way which is if the user enters lower = 1 and upper = 55 if the first number generated is 35 then it would search between 36-54 within that range, but a random number like 42 not just incrementing by one.

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What does "first output" mean? –  barak manos Jan 27 '14 at 22:32
    
So you want to generate random numbers between in an interval of [hi,lo]? –  Shafik Yaghmour Jan 27 '14 at 22:39
    
The first output guesses a number higher than the one originally guessed. Yes, between high and low. –  Oblivion24 Jan 27 '14 at 22:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What it seems to me is that you are trying to generate the random number the wrong way. To make a lower and upper bound like you are describing, try this instead:

x = lower + (rand() % (upper-lower)); // lower <= x < upper

In the case of -1, you can try using x+1 for the lower bound. In the case of decreasing the number, make the upper bound equal to x.

case -1:
{
  if (x < upper-1) {
    x = x+1 + (rand() % (upper-x-1));
  }
...

case 1:
{
  if (x > lower) {
    x = lower + (rand() % (x-lower));
  }
...

I'm not sure what values you have defined in the upper and lower variables, but only make sure that the lower limit is smaller than the upper limit. I have also added a special condition where a division by zero could occur.

share|improve this answer
    
The upper and lower values are inputted by the user. –  Oblivion24 Jan 27 '14 at 22:42
    
In that case, making sure that lower < upper before that procedure starts will be enough. I advise you to re-read my answer, I just added something that will prevent the code from dividing by 0. –  E_net4 Jan 27 '14 at 22:46
    
The only problem that I see in that code is that it doesn't add 1 when it loops to do another guess. If i do lower = 1 upper = 55, it starts at 48 then jumps to 52, 53, 54. –  Oblivion24 Jan 27 '14 at 22:53
    
Don't use modulus with rand(), you will get biased results. Using floating points is better, or iterate until in bounds. –  this Jan 27 '14 at 22:53
    
Without mod I get values outside the upper and lower bounds. With mod it does not go out of those bounds. –  Oblivion24 Jan 27 '14 at 22:56

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