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I've had a look around and seen people use: ^\W\d_ for an alpha match however, if you enter an alpha character first, then follow it with numeric characters, the match doesn't fail.

Here's the code I'm trying:

alpha = compile('[a-zA-Z]')
numeric = compile('[0-9]')
alphanumeric = compile('[a-zA-Z0-9]')


def alpha_test():
#Checks for alpha values
    cell = input('Enter an alpha value: ')
    alpha_valid = alpha.match(cell)
    if alpha_valid:
        print('The cell contains only alpha values.\n')
    else:
        print('Invalid. The cell contains other characters.\n')


def numeric_test():
#Checks for numeric values
    cell = input('Enter a numeric value: ')
    numeric_valid = numeric.match(cell)
    if numeric_valid:
        print('The cell contains only numeric values.\n')
    else:
        print('Invalid. The cell contains other characters.\n')


def alphanumeric_test():
#Checks for alphanumeric values
    cell = input('Enter an alphanumeric value: ')
    alphanumeric_valid = alphanumeric.match(cell)
    if alphanumeric_valid:
        print('The cell contains only alphanumeric values.\n')
    else:
        print('Invalid. The cell contains other characters.\n')


alpha_test()
numeric_test()
alphanumeric_test()

Maybe I have the wrong angle on what the match function provides? I understand that it can be used to match email formats and ensure they're correct but I thought it could also match character input.

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marked as duplicate by Andrew Clark, iCodez, jgritty, Matthew Trevor, Dennis Meng Jan 28 '14 at 6:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
[^\W\d_] means \w, but not digits nor underscore. Same as this [a-zA-Z] –  sln Jan 27 '14 at 22:31
    
Your regex's are only matching 1 character. To match more/all use a quantifier and anchors, like ^[a-zA-Z]+$ –  sln Jan 27 '14 at 22:36

2 Answers 2

I believe this is the answer to my question - Regex matches but shouldn't

Should have looked around a little longer, sorry all.

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Good catch though -- I didn't see anything obvious upon reading your code. –  Adam Smith Jan 27 '14 at 22:29

Your regex's are only matching 1 character. To match more/all use a quantifier and anchors, like ^[a-zA-Z]+$

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