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The two cards c1 and c4 seem to be equal...but they are not why. I want them to be equal so that only one of them is allowed in the Set. :|

import java.util.*;
class Card2
{
 private int value;
 private String type;

 public Card2(int v,String t)
 {
  value=v;
  type=t;
 }

 public int getValue()
 {
  return value;
 }

 public String getType()
 {
  return type;
 }

 public String toString()
 {
  return(type+" "+value);
 }

 public boolean equals(Object oo)
 {
  if(!(oo instanceof Card))
  return false;

  Card cc=(Card) oo;

  if(this.getValue()==cc.getValue() && this.getType().equals(cc.getType()))
  return true;
  else
  return false;
 }

 public int hashCode()
 {
  return value;
 }

 public static void main(String args[])
 {
  HashSet<Card> deck=new HashSet<Card>();

  Card c1=new Card(5,"Spade");

  Card c2=new Card(10,"Hearts");

  Card c3=c2; //Equal Ref card entity

  Card c4=new Card(5,"Spade");

  System.out.println(c1.equals(c4));

  deck.add(c1);
  deck.add(c2);
  deck.add(c4);
  deck.add(c3);

  for(Card cc:deck)
  System.out.println(cc);
 }
}
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4  
you used Card2 in your question, shouldn't it be Card instead ? It does not compiles right now. –  Valentin Rocher Jan 26 '10 at 12:57
1  
System.out.println(c1.equals(c4)) returns true and only two cards are printed in the loop: Hearts 10 & Spade 5 (I run the code changing Card2 to Card to fix it). What's the problem? –  JuanZe Jan 26 '10 at 12:58
5  
just fyi: if(...) return true; else return false; Why would you do this instead of return ...; ? –  KitsuneYMG Jan 26 '10 at 13:17
    
have you considered using something other than String for the card type? IIRC, Sun's explanation of enum includes the exact thing you are attempting to do. –  Carl Jan 26 '10 at 15:12

8 Answers 8

First of all: you called your class Card2 but refer to it as Card everywhere (including the equals() method. This answer assumes you replace all instances of Card2 with Card).

You defined equals() in a way to return true if the value and the type of the card to be the same.

c1 has a value of 5 and a type of Spade.

c4 has a value of 5 and a type of Spade.

The look pretty much the same to me.

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They are equal (once you fix the typo by replacing Card2 by Card), your program output is:

true
Hearts 10
Spade 5

What else did you expect?

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Actually that doesn't fix it since he's not even using Card2 –  cletus Jan 26 '10 at 13:07
2  
@cletus Replace both occurrences (class declaration + constructor) of "Card2" by "Card" and you'll get a valid program that works. Could you explain what isn't fixed then? –  Jerome Jan 26 '10 at 13:12
    
Clearly theres a class called Card that he's actually. It doesn't strike you as odd that he'd paste compile that doesn't compile? Clearly it does. Perhaps the name Card2 is a giveaway? So you're wrong and your revenge downvote is immature and has no place on SO. –  cletus Jan 26 '10 at 13:15
    
I'm assuming Card2 is a typo (as explained in my answer). Since the OP is not answering numerous comments about this very point, there's no way to tell for sure. –  Jerome Jan 26 '10 at 13:19

What is the problem? Output on my system is:

true
Spade 5
Hearts 10

Which seems to be exactly what you want.

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Your equals() method is wrong, try this instead:

public boolean equals(Object oo)
{
  if(!(oo instanceof Card2))
    return false;

  Card2 cc=(Card2) oo;

  return this.getValue()==cc.getValue() && this.getType().equals(cc.getType());
}

That is, you should be consistent in your usage of Card and Card2.

Also note that I changed your:

if(this.getValue()==cc.getValue() && this.getType().equals(cc.getType()))
  return true;
else
  return false;

to

return this.getValue()==cc.getValue() && this.getType().equals(cc.getType());

As this is shorter, and avoids violating a checkstyle rule. The reason why this is a good idea is that it complicates the code since what you are saying is "if something is true return true, otherwise if it is false, return false". Rather than force the reader of the code work out what you are doing, you can simply say "return something" and the eventual user of your code can more quickly understand what you are doing.

share|improve this answer
    
Card2 cc=(Card2) oo; not Card cc= ... –  Carlos Heuberger Jan 26 '10 at 13:36
    
@Carlos: Doh! Thanks, and fixed. –  Paul Wagland Jan 26 '10 at 13:38
    
The checkstyle rule doesn't give a reason. I'd be curious if there is a reason. I sometimes use that idiom (if () return true; return false;) if I think it makes the code clearer (rarely). –  Yishai Jan 26 '10 at 14:09
    
@Yishai: I have updated my answer. –  Paul Wagland Jan 26 '10 at 16:01

Your hashCode() is inconsistent with equals().

java.util.HashSet uses hashCode. You should implement hashCode() to take the type into account.

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2  
While taking the type into consideration when producing the hashCode() would be better, it's not necessary to be correct. In fact return 1; would be a correct (but very, very bad) hashCode() implementation for a standalone class. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 26 '10 at 13:00
1  
His hashCode() seems fine. hashCode() is not required to be the same as equals(). It just needs to satisfy that a.hashCode() != b.hashCode() then !a.equals(b). –  Itay Maman Jan 26 '10 at 13:01
2  
Or more intuitively: If a.equals(b) then a.hashCode()==b.hashCode() –  Draemon Jan 26 '10 at 13:05

There is another equality check missing from your equals() method. Check whether the objects themselves are the same reference. It's a short circuit for when you compare things like "c2.equals(c3)".

public boolean equals(Object oo)
{
  if(!(oo instanceof Card2))
    return false;

  if(this == oo) //comparing an object to itself is equal
    return true;

  Card2 cc=(Card2) oo;

  return this.getValue()==cc.getValue() && this.getType().equals(cc.getType());
}
share|improve this answer

Your equals method needs some improvements. You should test for null and for sameness. Also, using instanceof may result in equals becoming non-commutative, if you allow subclassing and implement equals in both classes. For example if Card2 extends Card, and Card has an equals that tests for instanceof Card, and Card2 overrides this with an equals that tests for instanceof Card2, then for an instance cc2 of class Card2 and another instance cc of Card the use of instanceof means that cc.equals(cc2) is true, but cc2.equals(cc) is false, which may lead to undesirable behavior.

You could do the following:

public boolean equals(Object other) {
    // null is not equal
    if (null == other)
        return false;
    // same is equal
    if (this == other)
        return true;
    // different class, not equal
    if (other.getClass() != getClass())
        return false;

Alternatively, if you want to allow subclassing, you should test only for properties that are in the superclass. So if Card has value, and Card2 extends Card and has value and type, then your equals method should only look for instanceof Card and compare only Card's attributes:

    //if (other.getClass() != getClass())
    //    return false;
    if (!(other instanceof Card))
        return false;
    card = (Card) other;
    if (this.getValue() == card.getValue())
        return true;
    return false;
} 

Then again, all this might be completely unrelated to your problem.

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1  
None of this answers his question, he IS properly checking for null, the 'sameness' optimization is not that important in the general case, and the finer points of instanceof vs. getClass -- both of which are broken in some circumstances -- only serves to confuse him more. I don't think this is a good answer. –  Kevin Bourrillion Jan 26 '10 at 15:47

Here is our well received Card class from a recent project; hopefully it will help you out. http://pastebin.com/qW41nwRE
The "state" is used to determine if the card is in the deck, in a hand, etc. The value is from 1 to 14 with 11 - 14 being the face cards (Jack, Queen, King, and Ace).

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