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I am familiar with this kind of query:

select * from tableA where foo like '%bar%'

But today I run into three adjacent percentage signs in some legacy code, like this:

select * from tableA where foo like '%%%'

This query seems to work, both on mssql and oracle, when foo is of string type (varchar, etc.) but it fails when foo is numeric.

Any idea what it means?

EDIT: sorry about the typo in original question, the query uses the LIKE operator.

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6  
Doesn't it just search for the string %%%? Or am I missing something? this is not like. –  Kobi Jan 26 '10 at 13:14
1  
did you mean "where foo like '%%%'" rather than "where foo='%%%'"? –  Eric Petroelje Jan 26 '10 at 13:14
    
As Kobi said. And your first query looks for '%bar%' as you are using an = not a LIKE operator. –  Wim Hollebrandse Jan 26 '10 at 13:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Turns out in mysql it matches everthing:

mysql> create database foo;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.06 sec)

mysql> use foo;
Database changed

mysql> create table foo ( bar char(20) );
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.06 sec)

mysql> desc foo;
+-------+----------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field | Type     | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+-------+----------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| bar   | char(20) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+-------+----------+------+-----+---------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into foo values ('endwith%');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.05 sec)

mysql> insert into foo values ('%startwith');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into foo values ('cont%ins');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into foo values ('doesnotcontain');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from foo where bar like '%%%';
+----------------+
| bar            |
+----------------+
| endwith%       |
| %startwith     |
| cont%ins       |
| doesnotcontain |
+----------------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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If you're trying to find any value with a percent in it you need to use ESCAPE:

e.g.

SELECT * 
FROM SomeTable
WHERE foo LIKE '%|%%' ESCAPE '|'

If foo is numeric (in datatype), then you will get an error if you try to compare a numeric value in the column with a string.

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Please read my answer with my comments now, to be able to understand why I said what I said. Also, is the ESCAPE clause applicable to sqlserver as well as oracle? –  shahkalpesh Jan 26 '10 at 13:41
    
@shahkalpesh - Yes, it is supported in SQL Server –  AdaTheDev Jan 26 '10 at 13:49
    
Thanks. I didn't know of ESCAPE clause in sql server. –  shahkalpesh Jan 26 '10 at 14:11
select * from tableA where foo='%%%'

Is equivalent with

select * from tableA where foo='%'

It the same idea as

ls *

or

ls **

Which means that it will match anything. And in the example: for MySQL "%" matches everything and for ls "*" matches everything

If you add 2 of % it's equivalent as one.

mysql> create table foo ( bar char(20) );
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.06 sec)

mysql> desc foo;
+-------+----------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field | Type     | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+-------+----------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| bar   | char(20) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+-------+----------+------+-----+---------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into foo values ('endwith%');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.05 sec)

mysql> insert into foo values ('%startwith');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into foo values ('cont%ins');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into foo values ('doesnotcontain');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from foo where bar like '%%%';
+----------------+
| bar            |
+----------------+
| endwith%       |
| %startwith     |
| cont%ins       |
| doesnotcontain |
+----------------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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That answer is useful, if one knows what ls * and ls ** do ;-) It'd be better to mention what it does explicitly as well. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 26 '10 at 13:51

In SQL '%' and '_' (underscore sign) are wildcard characters.
'%' replaces any number of characters - equivalent to '*' in Linux/Unix and Windows file search.
'_' replaces one character - equivalent to '?' in Linux/Unix and Windows file search.

As other mentioned, one '%' is equivalent to any number of consecutive '%', so in your query you can replace '%%%' with '%'

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Do you expect it to work with numeric types, esp. when you are passing in a string to compare the field with?

Also, what does the field foo has stored in it?

Usually a LIKE clause is used when doing a wild-card comparison. But, from your example it seems, the db has this field storing the wild-card criteria in it. And, %%% seems to mean - anything that contains only %%% as its value (esp. when you compare it with an = sign).

EDIT2: If I guess it right, LIKE '%%%' could mean anything that has % character in it.

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1  
%%% does not mean anything with a % character in it. To search for any value containing a percent, you'd need to escape it e.g. WHERE foo LIKE '%|%%' ESCAPE '|' –  AdaTheDev Jan 26 '10 at 13:19
    
@AdaTheDev: I have corrected my answer. OP had not mentioned the LIKE clause initially. –  shahkalpesh Jan 26 '10 at 13:33
    
Yeah, that's clearer now :) –  AdaTheDev Jan 26 '10 at 13:46
    
No, you've made it incorrect again with Edit2! LIKE '%%%' does NOT mean anything with a % character in...it will just return ALL records regardless of whether they contain a % sign in or not...hence my original point! –  AdaTheDev Jan 26 '10 at 13:51
    
@AdaTheDev: Thats what I thought initially. But, I didn't want to doubt the origial query writer to write such a clause (if it doesn't make sense). The query writer could write SELECT * FROM myTable instead of SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE foo like '%%%'. –  shahkalpesh Jan 26 '10 at 13:59

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