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I was under impression that it's impossible, see for example: Calling the constructor of the base class after some other instructions in C++
But the following program runs and produces 2 lines of "Constructor Person":

#include <iostream>

class Person
{
public:
    Person() { std::cout << "Constructor Person" << std::endl; }
};

class Child : public Person
{
public:
    Child() { c = 1; Person(); }
int c;
};

int main() {
Child child;
return 0;
}

The first one is implicit call of the default constructor, that's clear. What about the 2-nd one - does it mean that the action described in the title is legitimate? I use Visual C++ 2010.

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So according to answers/comments below the answer is: one should understand precisely the meaning of "Calling a constructor B of the base class from a subclass D constructor body". Constructor B can't be called in such way that it creates the parent's part of this child object. Thanks everybody! –  TT_ Jan 28 at 2:55
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3 Answers 3

The call inside the child class constructor is not calling the base class constructor, it is creating a temporary, unnamed and new object of type Person. It will be destroyed as the constructor exits. To clarify, your example is the same as doing this:

Child() { c = 1; Person tempPerson; }

Except in this case, the temporary object has a name.

You can see what I mean if you modify your example a little:

class Person
{
public:
    Person(int id):id(id) { std::cout << "Constructor Person " << id << std::endl; }
    ~Person(){ std::cout << "Destroying Person " << id << std::endl; }
    int id;
};

class Child : public Person
{
public:
    Child():Person(1) { c = 1; Person(2); }
int c;
};

int main() {
Child child;

Person(3);
return 0;
}

This produces the output:

Constructor Person 1
Constructor Person 2
Destroying Person 2
Constructor Person 3
Destroying Person 3
Destroying Person 1
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Yes, @happydave wrote the same in comments below. Probably, I don't understand what the constructor call means. If the Person(); in my or your examples are not constructor calls, when what exactly people mean when then say: you can't call base constructor from subclass constructor? –  TT_ Jan 28 at 2:14
1  
@TT_ They mean that you can't call it on that object. The value of the "this" pointer when your Person constructor runs the second time will be completely different from the "this" pointer the first time that it runs. Because the second time, it's just calling the constructor on a temporary, unrelated object. –  happydave Jan 28 at 2:21
    
@happydave ...meaning that my 2-nd constructor call has nothing to do with construction of the parent part of the child. This makes sense. It seems the terminology is not precise enough. –  TT_ Jan 28 at 2:40
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You can't call it from the body of the child constructor, but you can put it into the initializer list:

public:
    Child() : Person() { c = 1; }

Of course it's not helpful to call the default constructor of the parent because that will happen automatically. It's more useful if you need to pass a parameter to the constructor.

The reason you can't call the constructor from the body is because C++ guarantees the parent will be finished constructing before the child constructor starts.

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I know I can put it into the initializer list, I am asking why my code works (so I can call it from the body of the child constructor!). –  TT_ Jan 28 at 1:59
    
You're just instantiating a temporary Person object with your call to Person();. It has nothing to do with the Child object that is currently being constructed (except of course, for being called from the Child object's constructor). –  happydave Jan 28 at 2:00
    
@TT_ I don't think it's actually calling the constructor, at least not for the object you're interested in. –  Mark Ransom Jan 28 at 2:00
    
@happydave And again, it does not answer the question. I am not asking about side effects, the question is: why this code works? –  TT_ Jan 28 at 2:01
1  
@TT_ no I can't produce such an example because creating a temporary object is perfectly OK. It just doesn't accomplish what you're expecting. –  Mark Ransom Jan 28 at 2:33
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The following is an excerpt from "Accelerated C++": "Derived objects are constructed by:
1. Allocating space for the entire object (base class members as well as derived class members);
2. Calling the base-class constructor to initialize the base-class part of the object;
3. Initializing the members of the derived class as directed by the constructor initializer;
4. Executing the body of the derived-class constructor, if any."

Summarizing the answers and comments: Calling a constructor of the base class from a subclass' constructor body is impossible in the sense that #2 above must precede #4. But we still can create a base object in the derived constructor body thus calling a base constructor. It will be an object different from the object being constructed with the currently executed derived constructor.

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