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I have some badly generated JSON eg:

p_response({
    "glossary": {
        "title": "example glossary",
        "GlossDiv": {
            "title": "S",
            "GlossList": {
                "GlossEntry": {
                    "ID": "SGML",
                    "SortAs": "SGML",
                    "GlossTerm": "Standard Generalized Markup Language",
                    "Acronym": "SGML",
                    "Abbrev": "(ISO 8879:1986)",
                    "GlossDef": {
                        "para": "A meta-markup language, used to create markup languages such as DocBook.",
                        "GlossSeeAlso": ["GML", "XML"]
                    },
                    "GlossSee": "markup"
                }
            }
        }
    }
})

How can I parse the Json within the p_response parentheses? I cant use gsub, because the JSON body may have parentheses within it.

share|improve this question
    
If you're running this in Ruby, isn't it a Ruby Hash that's being passed to p_response, not JSON? Ruby 1.9+ hashes look similar to JSON, but they're not JSON. –  tjdett Jan 28 at 5:12
    
The response above is the webservice response. –  Yogzzz Jan 28 at 5:15
    
If it's wrapped in p_response, then it's more likely to be JSONP. –  tjdett Jan 28 at 5:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The result is JSONP.

Just remove leading p_response( and trailing ). Then you can parse it as JSON:

jsonp = <<JSONP
p_response({
    "glossary": {
        "title": "example glossary",
        "GlossDiv": {
            "title": "S",
            "GlossList": {
                "GlossEntry": {
                    "ID": "SGML",
                    "SortAs": "SGML",
                    "GlossTerm": "Standard Generalized Markup Language",
                    "Acronym": "SGML",
                    "Abbrev": "(ISO 8879:1986)",
                    "GlossDef": {
                        "para": "A meta-markup language, used to create markup languages such as DocBook.",
                        "GlossSeeAlso": ["GML", "XML"]
                    },
                    "GlossSee": "markup"
                }
            }
        }
    }
})
JSONP

require 'json'
json = jsonp.gsub(/\Ap_response\(|\)\Z/, '')
# OR = jsonp.gsub(/\A\w+\(|\)\Z/, '')
puts JSON.parse(json)

# \A - Matches beginning of string.
# \Z - Matches end of string. If string ends with a newline, it matches just before newline

output:

{"glossary"=>{"title"=>"example glossary", "GlossDiv"=>{"title"=>"S", "GlossList"=>{"GlossEntry"=>{"ID"=>"SGML", "SortAs"=>"SGML", "GlossTerm"=>"Standard Generalized Markup Language", "Acronym"=>"SGML", "Abbrev"=>"(ISO 8879:1986)", "GlossDef"=>{"para"=>"A meta-markup language, used to create markup languages such as DocBook.", "GlossSeeAlso"=>["GML", "XML"]}, "GlossSee"=>"markup"}}}}}

share|improve this answer
json_str = '{
    "glossary": {
        "title": "example glossary",
        "GlossDiv": {
            "title": "S",
            "GlossList": {
                "GlossEntry": {
                    "ID": "SGML",
                    "SortAs": "SGML",
                    "GlossTerm": "Standard Generalized Markup Language",
                    "Acronym": "SGML",
                    "Abbrev": "(ISO 8879:1986)",
                    "GlossDef": {
                        "para": "A meta-markup language, used to create markup languages such as DocBook.",
                        "GlossSeeAlso": ["GML", "XML"]
                    },
                    "GlossSee": "markup"
                }
            }
        }
    }
}'

require 'json'
j = JSON.parse json_str
share|improve this answer

Your response is JSONP. Assuming that p_response is always used as the callback function, and assuming x contains your web-service response:

x.sub(/^\s*p_response\(/, "").sub(/\)\s*$/,"")

That will leave you with clean JSON to parse, rather than JSONP.

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