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$test = array('hi');
$test += array('test','oh');
var_dump($test);

What does + mean for array in PHP?

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4  
I notice your question had += and the accepted answer had +. From my testing they seem to behave the same. –  user151841 Aug 24 '12 at 17:24
4  
The documentation sums it up pretty well –  artfulrobot Aug 22 '13 at 13:53
    
possible duplicate of Reference - What does this symbol mean in PHP? –  scrowler Jun 26 at 3:40

8 Answers 8

up vote 120 down vote accepted

Quoting from the PHP Manual on Language Operators

The + operator returns the right-hand array appended to the left-hand array; for keys that exist in both arrays, the elements from the left-hand array will be used, and the matching elements from the right-hand array will be ignored.

So if you do

$array1 = ['one',   'two',          'foo' => 'bar'];
$array2 = ['three', 'four', 'five', 'foo' => 'baz']; 

print_r($array1 + $array2);

You will get

Array
(
    [0] => one   // preserved from $array1 (left-hand array)
    [1] => two   // preserved from $array1 (left-hand array)
    [foo] => bar // preserved from $array1 (left-hand array)
    [2] => five  // added from $array2 (right-hand array)
)

So the logic of + is equivalent to the following snippet:

$union = $array1;

foreach ($array2 as $key => $value) {
    if (false === array_key_exists($key, $union)) {
        $union[$key] = $value;
    }
}

If you are interested in the details of the C-level implementation head to


Note, that + is different from how array_merge() would combine the arrays:

print_r(array_merge($array1, $array2));

would give you

Array
(
    [0] => one   // preserved from $array1
    [1] => two   // preserved from $array1
    [foo] => baz // overwritten from $array2
    [2] => three // appended from $array2
    [3] => four  // appended from $array2
    [4] => five  // appended from $array2
)

See linked pages for more examples.

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The + operator appends elements of remaining keys from the right handed array to the left handed, whereas duplicated keys are NOT overwritten.

<?php
$a = array("a" => "apple", "b" => "banana");
$b = array("a" => "pear", "b" => "strawberry", "c" => "cherry");

$c = $a + $b; // Union of $a and $b
echo "Union of \$a and \$b: \n";
var_dump($c);

$c = $b + $a; // Union of $b and $a
echo "Union of \$b and \$a: \n";
var_dump($c);
?>

When executed, this script will print the following:

Union of $a and $b:
array(3) {
  ["a"]=>
  string(5) "apple"
  ["b"]=>
  string(6) "banana"
  ["c"]=>
  string(6) "cherry"
}
Union of $b and $a:
array(3) {
  ["a"]=>
  string(4) "pear"
  ["b"]=>
  string(10) "strawberry"
  ["c"]=>
  string(6) "cherry"
}

not exactly like array_merge

Note that the plus operator for arrays ‘+’ is only one-dimensional, and is only suitable for simple arrays.

read more :

http://www.vancelucas.com/blog/php-array_merge-preserving-numeric-keys/

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8  
No offense, but if you copy 1:1 from php.net/manual/en/language.operators.array.php, then why not add a link indicating so? –  Gordon Jan 26 '10 at 14:59
    
@Gordon: I knew I'd read this text somewhere before... –  Powerlord Jan 26 '10 at 15:03
    
i link to another site that i copy from him , www.vancelucas.com..... i am usually give a credit –  Haim Evgi Jan 26 '10 at 15:17
    
Unless of source you suddenly wind up with "Fatal error: Unsupported operand types" –  doublejosh Mar 28 '13 at 5:40

This operator takes the union of two arrays (same as array_merge, except that with array_merge duplicate keys are overwritten).

The documentation for array operators is found here.

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1  
A word of caution for beginners here, the result of the operation is null if any one of the arrays is null. Some might not care about this assuming since it is a union operation, the result will be the proper (not-null) array if one of them is null. But, that holds true if one of the arrays is an empty array. –  Sandeepan Nath Jul 13 '12 at 6:52
    
So, as a good practice, I think, we should initialize the input arrays as empty arrays. What do you guys say? –  Sandeepan Nath Jul 13 '12 at 6:58

The best example I found for using this is in a config array.

$user_vars = array("username"=>"John Doe");
$default_vars = array("username"=>"Unknown", "email"=>"no-reply@domain.com");

$config = $user_vars + $default_vars;

The $default_vars, as it suggests, is the array for default values. The $user_vars array will overwrite the values defined in $default_vars. Any missing values in $user_vars are now the defaults vars from $default_vars.

This would print_r as:

Array(2){
    "username" => "John Doe",
    "email" => "no-reply@domain.com"
}

I hope this helps!

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It will append the new array to the previous.

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Carefull with numeric keys, if they should be preserved or if you don't want to loose anything

$a = array(2 => "a2", 4 => "a4", 5 => "a5");
$b = array(1 => "b1", 3 => "b3", 4 => "b4");

union

print_r($a+$b);
Array
(
    [2] => a2
    [4] => a4
    [5] => a5
    [1] => b1
    [3] => b3
)

merge

print_r(array_merge($a, $b));
Array
(
    [0] => a2
    [1] => a4
    [2] => a5
    [3] => b1
    [4] => b3
    [5] => b4
)
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The + operator produces the same results as array_replace(). However since the operator arguments are reversed, the ordering of the resulting array may also be different.

Expanding on another example from this page:

$array1 = array('one', 'two', 'foo' => 'bar');
$array2 = array('three', 'four', 'five', 'foo' => 'baz'); 

print_r($array1 + $array2);
print_r(array_replace($array2, $array1)); //note reversed argument order

outputs:

Array
(
    [0] => one   // preserved from $array1
    [1] => two   // preserved from $array1
    [foo] => bar // preserved from $array1
    [2] => five  // added from $array2
)
Array
(
    [0] => one   // preserved from $array1
    [1] => two   // preserved from $array1
    [2] => five  // added from $array2
    [foo] => bar // preserved from $array1
)
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$var1 = "example";
$var2 = "test";
$output = array_merge((array)$var1,(array)$var2);
print_r($output);

Array ( [0] => example [1] => test )

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This thread mentions a few times how array_merge() is NOT congruent. –  doublejosh Mar 28 '13 at 20:31

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