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I found this problem in one of challenges .

Problem is that we are given an integer N and we need to find smallest number X whose digits product is N

My approach is to fist find prime numbers with single digit eg for 10 multiples are 2,5 for 100 multiples are 2,2,5,5

  • Now I need to find smallest integer so I count no of 2's and no of 3's
  • If there are three 2's then I replace three 2's with one 8
  • If there are two 2's then I will replace two 2's with one 4
  • If there are two 3's then I will replace two 3's with one 9

Can you guys think of any better algo?

int getNumber(int n) {

    int temp = n;
    int a[4] ={2,3,5,7};
    std::string str;
    do
    {
        for(int i=0;i<4;++i)
        {
            int val = temp%a[i];
            if(val ==0)
            {
                char s[260];
                sprintf(s,"%d",a[i]);
                str += s;
                temp /=a[i];
                break;
            }

        }

    }while(temp>1);
    char newStr[260];
    int countof2=0,countof3=0;
    for(int i=0;i<str.length();++i)
    {
        if(str[i]=='2')
                ++countof2;
        if(str[i]=='3')
            ++countof3;
    }
    bool bFlag=false;
    int indexNew=0;
        if(countof2 >= 3)
        {

            int count =0;
            for(int index=0;index<str.length();++index)
            {
                if(str[index]=='2'&& count<3)
                    ++count;
                else
                {
                    newStr[indexNew]= str[index];
                    ++indexNew;
                }
            }
            newStr[indexNew]='8';
            bFlag=true;
        }
        else if(countof2 >=2)
        {
            newStr[indexNew++]='4';
            int count =0;
            for(int index=0;index<str.length();++index)
            {
                if(str[index]=='2'&& count<2)
                    ++count;
                else
                {
                    newStr[indexNew]= str[index];
                    ++indexNew;
                }
            }
            bFlag=true;
        }
        else if(countof3 >=2)
        {
            int count =0;
            for(int index=0;index<str.length();++index)
            {
                if(str[index]=='3'&& count<2)
                    ++count;
                else
                {
                    newStr[indexNew]= str[index];
                    ++indexNew;
                }
            }
            newStr[indexNew]='9';
            bFlag=true;
        }

        newStr[++indexNew]= '\0';
        int val=0;
        if(bFlag)
         val = atoi(newStr);
        else
         val = atoi(str.c_str());

    return val;
}
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5 Answers 5

Instead of looking for weird solutions with (2,2,2)->8, (3,3)->9 etc, I would just go with the straight forward solution (forget primes, go directly to all digits):

for (d = 9; d > 1; d--)
    while (n % d == 0) {
        n /= d;
        list.addDigit(d);
    }
if (n != 1) print("no such number"); else print(reverse(list));
share|improve this answer

If there exist prime divisor D of N such that D>=10 there is no solution.

Your approach is almost correct. The only remark is 6 = 2*3.
Optimal strategy is transforming many numbers to one number, like 2*2*2->8 and if there exist many variants to transform choose those one which gives the smallest number.

Perform these steps in the following order:

1) transform all (2,2,2) triples to 8.

2) (2,2)->4

3) (2,3)->6

4) (3,3)->9

Put all numbers into one array and sort it. Note that you have to also put into the result array numbers like 5,7, and remainders of 2 and 3.

Output sorted array - it will be answer to your question.

Example N = 96 = 2*2*2*2*3*3 = 8*6*3. Sort(8,6,3) - 3,6,8. Answer is 368.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean prime factor in the first paragraph? 100 is a divisor of 200, but 200 = 8*5*5. –  delnan Jan 28 '14 at 12:03
    
You are right, I meant prime divisors. Non prime divisors can be represented as a product of primes, so we can factorize number and perform transformations, assuming that the largest prime divisor<10. I updated my answer. –  Baurzhan Jan 28 '14 at 12:05

Let's assume D = set of all divisiors(not necesseraly prime) of N. Then one can compute dp(d) - minimal lenght of a number with digits product exactly d for all d in D. To reconstruct the answer, one can find the smallest x such as dp(d/x) = dp(x) - 1, starting with d = N, until d = 1. This algorithm produces the shortest and lexigraphically smallest number. Thus, it is correct. Greedy algorithm described in the answer above is incorrect. It produces 348 for N = 96 while the correct answer is 268. Here's my code.

import java.util.*;

public class Main {
        static Map<Integer, Integer> dp;

        public static void main(String[] args) {
                Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
                int N = in.nextInt();
                System.out.println(getNumber(N));
        }

        static int getNumber(int N) {
                if (N == 1)
                        return 1;
                dp = new HashMap<>();
                if (getDp(N) == Integer.MAX_VALUE)
                        return -1;
                String result = reconstruct(N);
                return Integer.parseInt(result);
        }

        static int getDp(int N) {
                if (N == 1)
                        return 0;
                if (dp.containsKey(N))
                        return dp.get(N);
                int best = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
                for (int digit = 2; digit <= 9; digit++)
                        if (N % digit == 0)
                                best = Math.min(best, getDp(N / digit) + 1);
                dp.put(N, best);
                return best;
        }

        static String reconstruct(int N) {
                if (N == 1)
                        return "";
                int minDigit = 2;
                while (N % minDigit != 0 || getDp(N / minDigit) + 1 != getDp(N))
                        minDigit++;
                String result = reconstruct(N / minDigit);
                return Integer.toString(minDigit) + result;
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi your algo looks interesting , but I am not able to understand it completely.Can you explain more on dp(d/x) = dp(x) -1 –  Alien01 Jan 28 '14 at 16:43

The find prime divisors and their powers for {2,3,5,7} . If after successive division still number remains greater than 1 then there is no solution because the remainder is prime and cannot be made from multiplication of {1-9}. Now only thing left is to combine the 2's & 3's such the combination is minimum.

find minimum by following : -

1. Combine all k (2,2,2) =>  k 8's
2. all m (2,2) => m 4's
3. all x (2,3) => x 6's
4. all y (3,3) => y 9's

Use sorting to get minimum solution in O(logN) where is N is the input number.

share|improve this answer

Well here's a solution that grows exponentially but easily be made a psuedo polynomial using dynamic programming technique.

I will start with a recursion in which we will start with least possible divisor and divide into sub problem. It will return the value of final division and save the minimum value as result.

EDIT: Just to add it works only for non prime inputs

int getMinDigit(int N, int P) {
    if(N == 1) {
        return P;
    }

    int div = 2;
    int min = INT_MAX;
    do {
        //checking if its divisible
        if(N%div == 0) {
            //get the other multiplier
            int Q = N/div;

            //we are done with our recursion
            if(Q < div)
                break;

            //getting the sub problem resolved
            int value = getMinDigit(Q, 10*P + div);
            min = min<value? min: value;
        }

        div++;
    } while(true);

    return min;
}

Time complexity for this algorithm is exponential. We can reduce the time complexity to psuedo polynomial using DP.

Simply calculate the subproblem in bottomup manner or memonize the solution per call. like P(6) P(9)

P(36)
|
P(2, P(18))
|    |
|    P(2, P(9)) (matching sub problem)
|    P(3, P(6))
P(3, P(12))
|    |
|    P(2, P(6))
|    P(3, P(4))
P(4, P(9)) <-- this is your solution
|    |
|    P(3, P(3));    
P(6, P(6))
|    |
|    P(2, P(3))
(x) break;
P(9, P(4))
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