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I am developing an MVC 5 web application using Entity Framework 5 Database First approach. I am using OWIN for the authentication of Users. Below shows my Login method within my Account Controller.

    public ActionResult Login(LoginViewModel model, string returnUrl)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            var user = _AccountService.VerifyPassword(model.UserName, model.Password, false);
            if (user != null)
            {
                var identity = new ClaimsIdentity(new[] { new Claim(ClaimTypes.Name, model.UserName), }, DefaultAuthenticationTypes.ApplicationCookie, ClaimTypes.Name, ClaimTypes.Role);

                identity.AddClaim(new Claim(ClaimTypes.Role, "guest"));
                identity.AddClaim(new Claim(ClaimTypes.GivenName, "A Person"));
                identity.AddClaim(new Claim(ClaimTypes.Sid, user.userID)); //OK to store userID here?

                AuthenticationManager.SignIn(new AuthenticationProperties
                {
                    IsPersistent = model.RememberMe
                }, identity);

                return RedirectToAction("Index", "MyDashboard");
            }
            else
            {
                ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid username or password.");
            }
        }
        // If we got this far, something failed, redisplay form
        return View(model);
    }

As you can see I'm creating a ClaimsIdentity and adding several claims to it, then passing it to OWIN using the AuthenticationManager to perform the sign in.

The problem I am having is that I'm not sure how to access the claims in the rest of my application, either in Controllers or in Razor Views.

I had tried the approach listed in this tutorial

http://brockallen.com/2013/10/24/a-primer-on-owin-cookie-authentication-middleware-for-the-asp-net-developer/

For example, I tried this in my Controller code in an attempt to get access to the values passed into the Claims, however, the user.Claims is equal to null

var ctx = HttpContext.GetOwinContext();
ClaimsPrincipal user = ctx.Authentication.User;
IEnumerable<Claim> claims = user.Claims;

Perhaps I am missing something here.

Any help would be greatly appreciated and I apologise if this is a novice question, it's my first experience with OWIN and using Claims Identity.

Thanks.

UPDATE

Based on Darin's answer, I added his code but still I fail to see access to the Claims. Please see screenshot below showing what I see when hovered over identity.Claims.

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Can you confirm that the cookie is sent back by the browser? Maybe your security settings demand SSL? –  leastprivilege Jan 29 '14 at 9:45
    
@leastprivilege Thanks, I'll look into that now. I found this question on Stackoverflow, stackoverflow.com/questions/20319118/… it is the exact same problem I am having, but unfortunately no answer to it :( –  tgriffiths Jan 29 '14 at 14:42
    
How are your OWIN components initialized? –  Derek Van Cuyk Aug 1 '14 at 19:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Try this:

[Authorize]
public ActionResult SomeAction()
{
    var identity = (ClaimsIdentity)User.Identity;
    IEnumerable<Claim> claims = identity.Claims;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. I used your suggested answer in an Action within a Controller to try and access the Claims values, however, I identity.Claims is still NULL (see updated question with screenshot). Any other ideas? I appreciate your help. –  tgriffiths Jan 28 '14 at 14:28
    
No, sorry I don't have other ideas. This has always worked for me. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 28 '14 at 14:58
    
no probs, thanks anyway. –  tgriffiths Jan 28 '14 at 15:00
    
Sorry, one last question. Do I need to create my own custom ClaimsAuthenticationManager class and Application_PostAuthenticateRequest() in Global.asax like this dotnetcodr.com/2013/02/25/… before my code above will work? Thanks again. –  tgriffiths Jan 28 '14 at 17:27
1  
Until you Authorize for the first time, you wont have access to this until after your login method which is why the OP doesn't see it at that time. You have to load manually at this time if you want it in the Login method. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Nov 24 '14 at 10:19

You can also do this:

//Get the current claims principal
var identity = (ClaimsPrincipal)Thread.CurrentPrincipal;
var claims = identity.Claims;

Update

To provide further explanation as per comments.

If you are creating users within your system as follows:

UserManager<applicationuser> userManager = new UserManager<applicationuser>(new UserStore<applicationuser>(new SecurityContext()));
ClaimsIdentity identity = userManager.CreateIdentity(user, DefaultAuthenticationTypes.ApplicationCookie);

You should automatically have some Claims populated relating to you Identity.

To add customized claims after a user authenticates you can do this as follows:

var user = userManager.Find(userName, password);
identity.AddClaim(new Claim(ClaimTypes.Email, user.Email));

The claims can be read back out as Darin has answered above or as I have.

The claims are persisted when you call below passing the identity in:

AuthenticationManager.SignIn(new AuthenticationProperties() { IsPersistent = persistCookie }, identity);

This article describes this in more detail and is specific to MVC 5, the other articles I know of are aimed at MVC 4.

http://kevin-junghans.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/using-claims-in-aspnet-identity.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but still this doesn't work for me. Can you see my updated question? Also, one last question. Do I need to create my own custom ClaimsAuthenticationManager class and Application_PostAuthenticateRequest() in Global.asax like this dotnetcodr.com/2013/02/25/… before my code above will work? Thanks again for your help. –  tgriffiths Jan 28 '14 at 17:29
    
Hi, I will take a look when I'm back on a PC. –  hutchonoid Jan 28 '14 at 17:40
    
thanks, really appreciate it. At a stage where this is starting to crack me up :) –  tgriffiths Jan 28 '14 at 17:42
    
@tgriffiths Hi, I've added an update for you. Hopefully providing a bit more info. Good luck. :) –  hutchonoid Jan 28 '14 at 19:18
    
unfortunately I'm not using the built in Entity Framework Code First, e.g., UserManager etc. But thanks for your input. Cheers. –  tgriffiths Jan 28 '14 at 21:58
Request.GetOwinContext().Authentication.User.Claims

However it is better to add the claims inside the "GenerateUserIdentityAsync" method, especially if regenerateIdentity in the Startup.Auth.cs is enabled.

share|improve this answer
    
The GenerateUserIdentityAsync was an awesome suggestion, I have totally overlooked it. Thanks a lot Basil. –  timmi4sa Jun 28 '14 at 1:20

You can also do this.

IEnumerable<Claim> claims = ClaimsPrincipal.Current.Claims;

share|improve this answer

This is an alternative if you don't want to use claims all the time. Take a look at this tutorial by Ben Foster.

public class AppUser : ClaimsPrincipal
{
    public AppUser(ClaimsPrincipal principal)
        : base(principal)
    {
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return this.FindFirst(ClaimTypes.Name).Value;
        } 
    }

}

Then you can add a base controller.

public abstract class AppController : Controller
{       
    public AppUser CurrentUser
    {
        get
        {
            return new AppUser(this.User as ClaimsPrincipal);
        }
    }
}

In you controller, you would do:

public class HomeController : AppController
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        ViewBag.Name = CurrentUser.Name;
        return View();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

To further touch on Darin's answer, you can get to your specific claims by using the FindFirst method:

        var identity = (ClaimsIdentity)User.Identity;
        var role = identity.FindFirst(ClaimTypes.Role).Value;
share|improve this answer

Remember that in order to query the IEnumerable you need to reference system.linq.
It will give you the extension object needed to do:

CaimsList.FirstOrDefault(x=>x.Type =="variableName").toString();
share|improve this answer

I make my own extended class to see what I need, so when I need into my controller or my View, I only add the using to my namespace something like this:

public static class UserExtended
{
    public static string GetFullName(this IPrincipal user)
    {
        var claim = ((ClaimsIdentity)user.Identity).FindFirst(ClaimTypes.Name);
        return claim == null ? null : claim.Value;
    }
    public static string GetAddress(this IPrincipal user)
    {
        var claim = ((ClaimsIdentity)user.Identity).FindFirst(ClaimTypes.StreetAddress);
        return claim == null ? null : claim.Value;
    }
    public ....
    {
      .....
    }
}

In my controller: using XXX.CodeHelpers.Extended;

var claimAddress = User.GetAddress();

In my razor @using DinexWebSeller.CodeHelpers.Extended;

@User.GetFullName()

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