Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking at this event example http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa645739%28VS.71%29.aspx

This all makes sense to me except that the following line

public event ChangedEventHandler Changed;

What does this do?? Is this some sort of list of EVentCallbacks?? Why is new not used here??

EDIT: Why does this not need a NEW keyword??

public event ChangedEventHandler Changed;

share|improve this question
    
Any MSDN URL with "(VS.71)" in it is from .NET 1.1. Don't use it. The modern version of the article is at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w369ty8x.aspx. –  John Saunders Jan 26 '10 at 16:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's declaring a field-like event, of type ChangedEventhandler, called Changed. Basically it's roughly equivalent to:

private ChangedEventHandler changedHandler;

public event ChangedEventHandler Changed
{
   add
   {
       lock(this)
       {
           changedHandler += value;
       }
   }
   remove
   {
       lock(this)
       {
           changedHandler -= value;
       }
   }
}

In other words, it creates an event which clients can subscribe to and unsubscribe from, and a variable to store those subscriptions. The event subscription/unsubscription code just combines/removes the given handler with the existing ones and stores the result in the field.

The result is that clients can subscribe to the event, e.g.

foo.Changed += ...;

and then when you raise the event, all the handlers are called.

See my article on events and delegates for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I am actually reading your MiscUtils code :-)... Why dont you use private ChangedEventHandler changedHandler = new ChangeEventHandler...?? –  Jack Kada Jan 26 '10 at 16:09
    
What do you mean, exactly? –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '10 at 16:10
    
What I mean is why do events not have to be decalred with the new keyword?? This seems really strange to me. Put differently you say "variable to store those subscriptions" - How is this field allocated? When does this field get allocated? Thats what makes no sense –  Jack Kada Jan 26 '10 at 16:13
    
@ChloeRadshaw: Why would they have to be declared with "new"? You don't write "new" for properties, or methods, or variables, do you? The variable in the above is the "private ChangedEventHandler changedHandler" - its default value is null, just like any other reference type field. –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '10 at 16:16

What it's doing is associating an event named Changed with the ChangedEventHandler delegate.

share|improve this answer

This is your actual custom event to which you attach your event handlers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.