Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Selecting without any weights (equal probabilities) is beautifully described here.

I was wondering if there is a way to convert this approach to a weighted one.

I am also interested in other approaches as well.

Update: Sampling without replacement

share|improve this question
2  
Is the sampling with or without replacement? –  Amro Jan 28 '10 at 2:13
2  
Either way, it's a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/352670/… –  Jason Orendorff Jan 28 '10 at 9:29
    
@Jason I was asking a way to convert that elegant approach to a weighted one, it is not quite duplicate –  nimcap Jan 28 '10 at 15:39
    
nimcap: The question I linked to is about weighted random selection. –  Jason Orendorff Jan 28 '10 at 16:38
1  
Sampling without replacement with weights in such a way that the weights are proportional to inclusion probabilities of each element is far from a trivial task, and there is good recent research about it. See for instance: books.google.com.br/books/about/… –  Ferdinand.kraft Aug 15 '13 at 10:41
show 2 more comments

9 Answers

If the sampling is with replacement, you can use this algorithm (implemented here in Python):

import random

items = [(10, "low"),
         (100, "mid"),
         (890, "large")]

def weighted_sample(items, n):
    total = float(sum(w for w, v in items))
    i = 0
    w, v = items[0]
    while n:
        x = total * (1 - random.random() ** (1.0 / n))
        total -= x
        while x > w:
            x -= w
            i += 1
            w, v = items[i]
        w -= x
        yield v
        n -= 1

This is O(n + m) where m is the number of items.

Why does this work? It is based on the following algorithm:

def n_random_numbers_decreasing(v, n):
    """Like reversed(sorted(v * random() for i in range(n))),
    but faster because we avoid sorting."""
    while n:
        v *= random.random() ** (1.0 / n)
        yield v
        n -= 1

The function weighted_sample is just this algorithm fused with a walk of the items list to pick out the items selected by those random numbers.

This in turn works because the probability that n random numbers 0..v will all happen to be less than z is P = (z/v)n. Solve for z, and you get z = vP1/n. Substituting a random number for P picks the largest number with the correct distribution; and we can just repeat the process to select all the other numbers.

If the sampling is without replacement, you can put all the items into a binary heap, where each node caches the total of the weights of all items in that subheap. Building the heap is O(m). Selecting a random item from the heap, respecting the weights, is O(log m). Removing that item and updating the cached totals is also O(log m). So you can pick n items in O(m + n log m) time.

Here's an implementation of that, plentifully commented:

import random

class Node:
    # Each node in the heap has a weight, value, and total weight.
    # The total weight, self.tw, is self.w plus the weight of any children.
    __slots__ = ['w', 'v', 'tw']
    def __init__(self, w, v, tw):
        self.w, self.v, self.tw = w, v, tw

def rws_heap(items):
    # h is the heap. It's like a binary tree that lives in an array.
    # It has a Node for each pair in `items`. h[1] is the root. Each
    # other Node h[i] has a parent at h[i>>1]. Each node has up to 2
    # children, h[i<<1] and h[(i<<1)+1].  To get this nice simple
    # arithmetic, we have to leave h[0] vacant.
    h = [None]                          # leave h[0] vacant
    for w, v in items:
        h.append(Node(w, v, w))
    for i in range(len(h) - 1, 1, -1):  # total up the tws
        h[i>>1].tw += h[i].tw           # add h[i]'s total to its parent
    return h

def rws_heap_pop(h):
    gas = h[1].tw * random.random()     # start with a random amount of gas

    i = 1                     # start driving at the root
    while gas > h[i].w:       # while we have enough gas to get past node i:
        gas -= h[i].w         #   drive past node i
        i <<= 1               #   move to first child
        if gas > h[i].tw:     #   if we have enough gas:
            gas -= h[i].tw    #     drive past first child and descendants
            i += 1            #     move to second child
    w = h[i].w                # out of gas! h[i] is the selected node.
    v = h[i].v

    h[i].w = 0                # make sure this node isn't chosen again
    while i:                  # fix up total weights
        h[i].tw -= w
        i >>= 1
    return v

def random_weighted_sample_no_replacement(items, n):
    heap = rws_heap(items)              # just make a heap...
    for i in range(n):
        yield rws_heap_pop(heap)        # and pop n items off it.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for awesome use of Python control structure variations that I haven't seen before –  Sparr Jan 27 '10 at 23:57
    
See my answer to another question for a Python implementation of the binary-tree method: stackoverflow.com/questions/526255/… –  Darius Bacon Jan 28 '10 at 2:56
    
Darius Bacon: Upvoted! While I was fiddling with this I found that you don't need a tree. It can be done with a heap. So I added an implementation of my own to this answer. –  Jason Orendorff Jan 28 '10 at 6:56
    
Nice idea with the heap! I found the name 'heap' misleading for what you did, though, since that's usually taken to mean a structure that obeys the heap invariant on the weights. Here the heap invariant does apply, but to the .tw field and it's incidental to how your code works, if I understand it right. –  Darius Bacon Jan 30 '10 at 1:41
1  
The "repair" strategy is probably the fastest. You can speed that up by storing the original values in each Node, rather than a separate dictionary. –  Jason Orendorff May 3 '12 at 20:08
show 14 more comments

If the sampling is with replacement, use the roulette-wheel selection technique (often used in genetic algorithms):

  1. sort the weights
  2. compute the cumulative weights
  3. pick a random number in [0,1]*totalWeight
  4. find the interval in which this number falls into
  5. select the elements with the corresponding interval
  6. repeat k times

alt text

If the sampling is without replacement, you can adapt the above technique by removing the selected element from the list after each iteration, then re-normalizing the weights so that their sum is 1 (valid probability distribution function)

share|improve this answer
9  
+1, this wins big on clarity. But note that the roulette-wheel algorithm takes O(n log m + m) time, where n is the number of samples and m is the number of items. That's if you omit the sorting, which is unnecessary, and do a binary search in step 4. Also, it requires O(m) space for the cumulative weights. In my answer there's a 14-line function that does the same thing in O(n + m) time and O(1) space. –  Jason Orendorff Jan 28 '10 at 9:41
1  
If I have to remove selected element I need to copy the whole list, I am assuming we are not allowed to do any modification on the input list, which is expensive. –  nimcap Jan 28 '10 at 10:03
    
do you need to sort the weights? is it necassary? –  Matthieu N. Jan 4 '11 at 6:20
    
@Zenikoder: I believe you right in that sorting is not needed, it's just that it might make the search in step 4 easier... –  Amro Jan 7 '11 at 12:30
1  
Do you think that using a Fenwick tree can help here? –  sw. Mar 22 '12 at 14:22
show 1 more comment

I've done this in Ruby

https://github.com/fl00r/pickup

require 'pickup'
pond = {
  "selmon"  => 1,
  "carp" => 4,
  "crucian"  => 3,
  "herring" => 6,
  "sturgeon" => 8,
  "gudgeon" => 10,
  "minnow" => 20
}
pickup = Pickup.new(pond, uniq: true)
pickup.pick(3)
#=> [ "gudgeon", "herring", "minnow" ]
pickup.pick
#=> "herring"
pickup.pick
#=> "gudgeon"
pickup.pick
#=> "sturgeon"
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to generate large arrays of random integers with replacement, you can use piecewise linear interpolation. For example, using NumPy/SciPy:

import numpy
import scipy.interpolate

def weighted_randint(weights, size=None):
    """Given an n-element vector of weights, randomly sample
    integers up to n with probabilities proportional to weights"""
    n = weights.size
    # normalize so that the weights sum to unity
    weights = weights / numpy.linalg.norm(weights, 1)
    # cumulative sum of weights
    cumulative_weights = weights.cumsum()
    # piecewise-linear interpolating function whose domain is
    # the unit interval and whose range is the integers up to n
    f = scipy.interpolate.interp1d(
            numpy.hstack((0.0, weights)),
            numpy.arange(n + 1), kind='linear')
    return f(numpy.random.random(size=size)).astype(int)

This is not effective if you want to sample without replacement.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's a Go implementation from geodns:

package foo

import (
    "log"
    "math/rand"
)

type server struct {
    Weight int
    data   interface{}
}

func foo(servers []server) {
    // servers list is already sorted by the Weight attribute

    // number of items to pick
    max := 4

    result := make([]server, max)

    sum := 0
    for _, r := range servers {
        sum += r.Weight
    }

    for si := 0; si < max; si++ {
        n := rand.Intn(sum + 1)
        s := 0

        for i := range servers {
            s += int(servers[i].Weight)
            if s >= n {
                log.Println("Picked record", i, servers[i])
                sum -= servers[i].Weight
                result[si] = servers[i]

                // remove the server from the list
                servers = append(servers[:i], servers[i+1:]...)
                break
            }
        }
    }

    return result
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

In the question you linked to, Kyle's solution would work with a trivial generalization. Scan the list and sum the total weights. Then the probability to choose an element should be:

1 - (1 - (#needed/(weight left)))/(weight at n). After visiting a node, subtract it's weight from the total. Also, if you need n and have n left, you have to stop explicitly.

You can check that with everything having weight 1, this simplifies to kyle's solution.

Edited: (had to rethink what twice as likely meant)

share|improve this answer
1  
let's say I have 4 elements in the list with weights {2, 1, 1, 1}. I am going to choose 3 from this list. According to your formula, for the first element 3* 2/5 = 1.2 Which is >1 What am I missing here? –  nimcap Jan 26 '10 at 17:03
    
It's been corrected above, thanks. –  Kyle Butt Jan 26 '10 at 17:26
    
now with {2,1,1,1} choose 3, the probability of picking the first element is 1 - (1 - (3/5))/2 = 1 - (2/5)/2 = 1 - 1/5 = 4/5, as expected. –  Kyle Butt Jan 26 '10 at 17:58
    
I believe there is something wrong with your formula, I don't have time to write it now, I will when I have time. If you try to apply formula for the first two elements in different orders, you will see it won't produce the same results. It should provide the same results regardless of the order. –  nimcap Jan 26 '10 at 22:32
    
say there are 4 elements with weights {7, 1, 1, 1} and we are going to pick 2. Lets calculate the chance of picking first 2 elements: P(1st)*P(2nd) = (1-(1-2/10)/7)*(1-(1-1/3)) = 31/105. Let's change the list to {1, 7, 1, 1}, probability of picking the first 2 elements should remain same P(1st)*P(2nd) = (1-(1-2/10))*(1-(1-1/9)/7) = 11/63. They are not same. –  nimcap Jan 27 '10 at 8:42
show 2 more comments

This one does exactly that with O(n) and no excess memory usage. I believe this is a clever and efficient solution easy to port to any language. The first two lines are just to populate sample data in Drupal.

function getNrandomGuysWithWeight($numitems){
  $q = db_query('SELECT id, weight FROM theTableWithTheData');
  $q = $q->fetchAll();

  $accum = 0;
  foreach($q as $r){
    $accum += $r->weight;
    $r->weight = $accum;
  }

  $out = array();

  while(count($out) < $numitems && count($q)){
    $n = rand(0,$accum);
    $lessaccum = NULL;
    $prevaccum = 0;
    $idxrm = 0;
    foreach($q as $i=>$r){
      if(($lessaccum == NULL) && ($n <= $r->weight)){
        $out[] = $r->id;
        $lessaccum = $r->weight- $prevaccum;
        $accum -= $lessaccum;
        $idxrm = $i;
      }else if($lessaccum){
        $r->weight -= $lessaccum;
      }
      $prevaccum = $r->weight;
    }
    unset($q[$idxrm]);
  }
  return $out;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I putting here a simple solution for picking 1 item, you can easily expand it for k items (Java style):

double random = Math.random();
double sum = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
    val = items[i];
    sum += val.getValue();
    if (sum > random) {
        selected = val;
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I used a associative map (weight,object). for example:

{
(10,"low"),
(100,"mid"),
(10000,"large")
}

total=10110

peek a random number between 0 and 'total' and iterate over the keys until this number fits in a given range.

share|improve this answer
1  
The way I see it, the question is about selecting multiple items in a single pass (see the linked question). Your approach requires a pass for each selection. –  Oak Jan 27 '10 at 17:22
add comment

protected by Community Dec 15 '13 at 14:59

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.