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I have a problem with Perl script for Linux. It's main purpose is to be middleman between 3 applications. What it should do:

  1. It should be able to wait for UDP text (without spaces) on $udp_port
  2. When it receives that UDP text it should forward it to the TCP client that is connected

Problem is my app currently works until the first time I disconnect with TCP client. Then I cannot connect to it any longer, and it times out after it receives next UDP packet on $udp_port. So basically whenever I want to reconnect with TCP I have to restart app.

All of this should be as fast as possible (every millisecond counts). The text sent to UDP or TCP doesn't contain spaces. It's not necessary to be able to support multiple TCP clients at once, but it would certainly be advantage :-)

Here's my current code:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use IO::Socket;
use Net::hostent;
use threads;
use threads::shared;

my $tcp_port = "10008";  # connection from TCP Client
my $udp_port = "2099";  # connection from Announcer
my $udp_password = ""; # password from Announcer
my $title = "Middle Man server version 0.1";
my $tcp_sock = IO::Socket::INET->new( Proto => 'tcp', LocalPort => $tcp_port, Listen => SOMAXCONN,Reuse => 1)|| die @!;
my $udp_sock = new IO::Socket::INET(LocalPort => $udp_port, Proto => "udp") || die @!;

my (@threads);

print "[$title]\n";

sub mySubTcp($)
{
  my ($popup) = @_;

  print "[TCP][CLIENT CONNECTED]\n";
  while (my $answer = <$popup>)
  {
chomp $answer;
my ($pass, $announce) = split ' ', $answer;
print $answer . '\n';
  }
  printf "[TCP][CLIENT DISCONNECTED]\n";
}

my $client = $tcp_sock->accept();
$client->autoflush(1);


my $thr = threads->new(\&mySubTcp, $client);


while ($udp_sock->recv(my $buf, 1024))
{
  chomp $buf;

  my $announce = $buf;
    print "[ANNOUNCE] $announce [START]\n";
    print $client $announce . "\n";
    print "[ANNOUNCE] $announce [END]\n";

}

Here's the code i tried after couple of suggestions to go without threading. Problem is even thou i am able to connect with TCP Client msg "Trying to setup UDP\n is never displayed. Probably something i'm doing wrong. The tcp client just connects and waits for server to send some data. Udp arrives but it's not accepted. Here's the code:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use IO::Socket;
use Net::hostent;
use threads;
use threads::shared;

my $tcp_port = "10008";  # connection from Tcp
my $udp_port = "2099";  # connection from Announcer

my $title = "Middle Man server version 0.2";
my $tcp_sock = IO::Socket::INET->new( Proto => 'tcp', LocalPort => $tcp_port, Listen => SOMAXCONN,Reuse => 1)|| die @!;

my (@threads);

print "[$title]\n";

for (;;)
{
    my $open_socket = $tcp_sock->accept();
    print "[TCP][CLIENT CONNECTED]\n";
    while (my $input = <$open_socket>)
    {
    print "Trying to setup UDP\n";
    my $udp_sock = new IO::Socket::INET(LocalPort => $udp_port, Proto => "udp") || die @!;
    while ($udp_sock->recv(my $buf, 1024)) {
          chomp $buf;
          print "\[ANNOUNCER\] $buf \[START\]\n";
          print $open_socket $buf . "\n";
          print "\[ANNOUNCER\] $buf \[END\]\n";
    }
    print "Closing UDP\n";
    close $udp_sock;
    #chomp $input;
    #print $input;
}

    close $open_socket;
    printf "[TCP][CLIENT DISCONNECTED]\n";
}
share|improve this question
    
I thought it's global variable. I've fixed it now. –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 17:31
    
You might want to look at Lincoln Stein's Network Programming with Perl to see how you should build a server that can continually accept new connections. That code accepts one connection, spawns a thread, and is done. It only accepts one connection because you told it to only accept one connection :) –  brian d foy Jan 26 '10 at 19:26
    
Think about what happens when you try and write data to a socket where the remote end has disconnected. Such as when you've read data from $udp_sock and print it to $client (which is your TCP socket). –  Mark Johnson Jan 26 '10 at 22:35
    
brian d foy yes i know, but i pasted the first code just to give ppl idea what i have and what i need. I tried diffrent solutions and this was the only one actually working without problems. –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 22:52
    
In your second example, you never see "Trying to setup UDP" because you block trying to read data from $open_socket. Is your middle man server supposed to read data from the TCP client(s)? If so, what is it supposed to do with it? –  Mark Johnson Jan 27 '10 at 3:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's not threaded, but I think this does what I think you want:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use IO::Socket;
use IO::Select;

my $tcp_port = "10008"; 
my $udp_port = "2099";

my $tcp_socket = IO::Socket::INET->new(
                                       Listen    => SOMAXCONN,
                                       LocalAddr => 'localhost',
                                       LocalPort => $tcp_port,
                                       Proto     => 'tcp',
                                       ReuseAddr => 1,
                                      );

my $udp_socket = IO::Socket::INET->new(
                                       LocalAddr => 'localhost',
                                       LocalPort => $udp_port,
                                       Proto     => 'udp',
                                      );

my $read_select  = IO::Select->new();
my $write_select = IO::Select->new();

$read_select->add($tcp_socket);
$read_select->add($udp_socket);

## Loop forever, reading data from the UDP socket and writing it to the
## TCP socket(s).  Might want to install some kind of signal handler to
## ensure a clean shutdown.
while (1) {

    ## No timeout specified (see docs for IO::Select).  This will block until a TCP
    ## client connects or we have data.
    my @read = $read_select->can_read();   

    foreach my $read (@read) {

        if ($read == $tcp_socket) {

            ## Handle connect from TCP client.  Note that UDP connections are 
            ## stateless (no accept necessary)...
            my $new_tcp = $read->accept();
            $write_select->add($new_tcp);

        }
        elsif ($read == $udp_socket) {

            ## Handle data received from UDP socket...
            my $recv_buffer;

            $udp_socket->recv($recv_buffer, 1024, undef);

            ## Write the data read from UDP out to the TCP client(s).  Again, no 
            ## timeout.  This will block until a TCP socket is writable.  What 
            ## happens if no TCP clients are connected?  Will IO::Select throw some
            ## kind of error trying to select on an empty set of sockets, or will the
            ## data read from UDP just get dropped on the floor?  
            my @write = $write_select->can_write(); 

            foreach my $write (@write) {

                ## Make sure the socket is still connected before writing.  Do we also
                ## need a SIGPIPE handler somewhere?
                if ($write->connected()) {
                    $write->send($recv_buffer);
                }
                else {
                    $write_select->remove($write);
                }

            }

        }

    }

}

Disclaimer: I just banged that out. I imagine it's very fragile. Don't try and use that in a production environment without much testing and bulletproofing. It might eat your data. It might try and eat your lunch. Use at your own risk. No warranty.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello, thanks for example. I haven't tested it yet but comparing to Sinan idea would you say it's faster? I mentioned it has to be realy fast and i am wondering if it's the same or faster then my current (crippled) solution? –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 21:52
    
I don't see a concrete implementation from Sinan. –  Mark Johnson Jan 26 '10 at 22:23
    
Please see 'my' implementation (not working) in first post (2nd code) which seems to replicate what he suggested. But it has some problem which i can't find what it is. –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 22:47
    
I've tested your code Mark and it seems to work fine (and fast). Now the only question is if it can be faster then it already is? Will Sinan idea from first post be faster. Or if threading would make it faster? Thanks a bunch for the example code :-) –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 22:59
2  
I don't see what benefit threads could be unless you needed to handle a lot of connections (many thousands). You can't write the data out any faster than you can read it. –  Mark Johnson Jan 27 '10 at 3:22

After it disconnects, you'll probably want to loop around and wait for a new connection with ->accept again.

It would also be a good idea to use strict; and use warnings; to ferret out any errors.

Edit: And I don't think glob does whatever you think it does there.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is with udp server which gets broken after adding a loop over Tcp. I am not getting any text from UDP that is being sent. Care to share working example? I've spent like couple of days trying to figure different approach for it until i gave up couple weeks ago. But thought i would give it a try on forum. –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 17:13
1  
No idea -- I've tapped the depth of my socket and thread knowledge. From this point on, I'll have to observe to learn. –  Anonymous Jan 26 '10 at 17:25

Try to boil down your code into the simplest possible program that accepts a TCP connection, disconnects, then accepts another one. When you've gotten that far, everything else is just refining the details.

Anonymous's hints were bang on. You've got way too many little errors in the code you included in your question, so you'd be better off starting over with a simple case and then building it up.

A simple TCP listener might look something like this -- it simply listens on a port on localhost and prints what it sees:

use strict; use warnings;
use IO::Socket;
my $socket = IO::Socket::INET->new(
    LocalHost => 'localhost',
    LocalPort => '5555',
    Proto => 'tcp',
    Listen => 1,
    Reuse => 1,
) or die "Could not create socket: $!";

for (;;)
{
    my $open_socket = $socket->accept();
    print "Got a connection!\n";
    while (my $input = <$open_socket>)
    {
        print $input;
    }
    close $open_socket;
    print "Connection closed.\n\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Ether but like i tried to explain the problem (i'm not counting my stupid thinking glob is global variable) doesn't lay within the tcp that i can't create to accept connection everytime someone joins. The problem is i can't "connect" it with udp and with sharing variable between UDP Server and TCP Client. Everytime i tried to do that i've failed. –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 17:39
    
I've extended your code by adding udp server but it seems to fail for me. Well Tcp connection works (mutiple tcp connect/disconnect) were possible but i can't reach udp server.. Can you check example in question and tell me what i'm doing wrong? –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 22:42
    
@MadBoy: you're grabbing data from the UDP connection only after the TCP connection receives some data -- instead what you probably want is to listen to the UDP connection immediately and write to the TCP connection (the TCP connection is for writing, not listening, correct?) –  Ether Jan 26 '10 at 23:27
    
TCP Client connects and waits. Anything that is received thru UDP should be sent asap to TCP Client. I'm using now Mark Johnson code with Selects which seems to work, just wondering which solution is faster. –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 23:40

You have some design issues you need to confront (which have nothing to do with Perl or threads, really).

As I understand it, your application is supposed to receive some UDP messages and pass them onto a client or clients connected on a TCP socket.

What do you do with UDP messages received when there is no client connected on the TCP socket? Do you save them to deliver to the first TCP client that connects or just discard them?

If the design is simple, that is, if it is something along the lines of:

  • Your app serves at most one TCP client at any given time
  • Your app waits for a client to connect on the TCP socket
  • Once a connection arrives, create a new UDP socket
  • Every time a message is received on the UDP socket, send it over the TCP socket
  • Once the TCP client disconnects, tear down UDP socket, go back to waiting for TCP connections

you do not need any multithreading at all.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried your suggestion. Please see first post for 2nd code. I'm most likely doing something wrong with opening tcp/udp. Opening new tcp and connecting disconnecting multiple times works but it never opens up udp. –  MadBoy Jan 26 '10 at 22:41

There are lots of event loops on CPAN. Have a look at AnyEvent -- after you learn to think in "event programming" then it'll be relatively easy (and more flexible than just a non-blocking listener).

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, AnyEvent::Socket has no udp_server(). –  Mark Johnson Jan 27 '10 at 7:17
    
Mark: Ah, I didn't realize that. Well, it sounds like that'd just be a small matter of programming, no? :-) –  Ask Bjørn Hansen Jan 30 '10 at 4:52
    
Ask: Should be doable, yes. I only know enough about socket programming to be dangerous, but I'll take a shot at it when I get some time. –  Mark Johnson Feb 17 '10 at 22:30

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