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I have a Django model that looks like this.

class Solution(models.Model):
    '''
    Represents a solution to a specific problem.
    '''
    name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
    problem = models.ForeignKey(Problem)
    description = models.TextField(blank=True)
    date = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add=True)

    class Meta:
        unique_together = ("name", "problem")

I use a form for adding models that looks like this:

class SolutionForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = Solution
        exclude = ['problem']

My problem is that the SolutionForm does not validate Solution's unique_together constraint and thus, it returns an IntegrityError when trying to save the form. I know that I could use validate_unique to manually check for this but I was wondering if there's any way to catch this in the form validation and return a form error automatically.

Thanks.

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2  
Are you sure that you set up everything correctly because the documentation about model forms syas clearly: "By default the clean() method validates the uniqueness of fields that are marked as unique, unique_together or unique_for_date|month|year on the model. " docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.1/topics/forms/modelforms/… – Felix Kling Jan 26 '10 at 18:47
2  
can you try it without the exclude part? manually select the problem that i assume is determined by your view. – Brandon H Jan 26 '10 at 20:27

I solved this same problem by overriding the validate_unique() method of the ModelForm:


def validate_unique(self):
    exclude = self._get_validation_exclusions()
    exclude.remove('problem') # allow checking against the missing attribute

    try:
        self.instance.validate_unique(exclude=exclude)
    except ValidationError, e:
        self._update_errors(e.message_dict)

Now I just always make sure that the attribute not provided on the form is still available, e.g. instance=Solution(problem=some_problem) on the initializer.

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Note that this only validates any forms for this model, while unique_together is used in the underlying database. That means that anything that uses the model objects directly are not bound by this validation. – Herge Aug 9 '12 at 16:16

As Felix says, ModelForms are supposed to check the unique_together constraint in their validation.

However, in your case you are actually excluding one element of that constraint from your form. I imagine this is your problem - how is the form going to check the constraint, if half of it is not even on the form?

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2  
Indeed that was the problem. So I guess that I can't get an error on the form without also including the problem field and that I'll have to manually check for this case. – sttwister Jan 27 '10 at 15:16
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I managed to fix this without modifying the view by adding a clean method to my form:

class SolutionForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = Solution
        exclude = ['problem']

    def clean(self):
        cleaned_data = self.cleaned_data

        try:
            Solution.objects.get(name=cleaned_data['name'], problem=self.problem)
        except Solution.DoesNotExist:
            pass
        else:
            raise ValidationError('Solution with this Name already exists for this problem')

        # Always return cleaned_data
        return cleaned_data

The only thing I need to do now in the view is to add a problem property to the form before executing is_valid.

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6  
Don't use a bare except clause. This will pass even if the exception is due to the database server being hit by a meteor. Instead, use "except Solution.DoesNotExist:". – GDorn Oct 15 '13 at 21:38

the solution from @sttwister is right but can be simplified.

class SolutionForm(forms.ModelForm):

    class Meta:
        model = Solution
        exclude = ['problem']

    def clean(self):
        cleaned_data = self.cleaned_data
        if Solution.objects.filter(name=cleaned_data['name'],         
                                   problem=self.problem).exists():
            raise ValidationError(
                  'Solution with this Name already exists for this problem')

        # Always return cleaned_data
        return cleaned_data

As a bonus you do not retreive the object in case of duplicate but only check if it exists in the database saving a little bit of performances.

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You will need to do something like this:

def your_view(request):
    if request.method == 'GET':
        form = SolutionForm()
    elif request.method == 'POST':
        problem = ... # logic to find the problem instance
        solution = Solution(problem=problem) # or solution.problem = problem
        form = SolutionForm(request.POST, instance=solution)
        # the form will validate because the problem has been provided on solution instance
        if form.is_valid():
            solution = form.save()
            # redirect or return other response
    # show the form
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The form still doesn't validate the unique_together constraint, probably because problem is mentioned in the exclude property, even though it has a valid instance – sttwister Jan 28 '10 at 16:06

With the help of Jarmo's answer, the following seems to work nicely for me (in Django 1.3), but it's possible I've broken some corner case (there are a lot of tickets surrounding _get_validation_exclusions):

class SolutionForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = Solution
        exclude = ['problem']

    def _get_validation_exclusions(self):
        exclude = super(SolutionForm, self)._get_validation_exclusions()
        exclude.remove('problem')
        return exclude

I'm not sure, but this seems like a Django bug to me... but I'd have to look around the previously-reported issues.


Edit: I spoke too soon. Maybe what I wrote above will work in some situations, but not in mine; I ended up using Jarmo's answer directly.

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If you want the error message to be a associated with the name field (and appear next to it):

def clean(self):
    cleaned_data = super().clean()
    name_field = 'name'
    name = cleaned_data.get(name_field)

    if name:
        if Solution.objects.filter(name=name, problem=self.problem).exists():
            cleaned_data.pop(name_field)  # is also done by add_error
            self.add_error(name_field, _('There is already a solution with this name.'))

    return cleaned_data
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