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I'm using the Netbeans IDE, and it has not detected any bugs. I'm just curious as to why this code is not executing. FYI this is Exercise 4.4 from "Think Java: How to think like a computer scientist."

import java.lang.Math;
public class Exercise {
    public static void checkFermat(int a, int b, int c, int n){

        if ((Math.pow(a, n))+(Math.pow(b, n))==(Math.pow(c, n)) && n!=2){
            System.out.println("Holy smokes, Fermat was wrong!");
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("No, why would that work?");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]){
        int a = 8;
        int b = 4;
        int c = 10;
        int n = 3;
    }
}
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closed as off-topic by Doorknob, Marko Topolnik, frictionlesspulley, lpapp, Lance Roberts Jan 28 '14 at 17:38

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Doorknob, Marko Topolnik, frictionlesspulley, lpapp, Lance Roberts
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
...because you never call checkFermat? –  Doorknob Jan 28 '14 at 17:27
7  
I don't agree with the downvotes. If the poster is (apparently) learning Java, this is a perfectly reasonable question to ask. Just because the answer is obvious to an experienced programmer, does not mean it is obvious to a beginner. –  Eric J. Jan 28 '14 at 17:30
    
@EricJ. Chatroom/meta effect –  Joe Jan 28 '14 at 17:35

5 Answers 5

You never call the checkFermat function from main. The only code that is executed in a Java program is the code inside of main. Any other methods that you define are only executed if they are called from within main. Therefore, your code should read:

import java.lang.Math;

public class Exercise {
    public static void checkFermat(int a, int b, int c, int n){

        if ((Math.pow(a, n))+(Math.pow(b, n))==(Math.pow(c, n)) && n!=2){
            System.out.println("Holy smokes, Fermat was wrong!");
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("No, why would that work?");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]){
        int a = 8;
        int b = 4;
        int c = 10;
        int n = 3;

        checkFermat(a, b, c, n); //call the method here
    }
}

Also, your local variables a, b, c, and n are not automatically applied to the function. You must pass them as arguments explicitly. Note the a, b, c, and n variables inside of main are completely separate from the a, b, c, and n in checkFermat: they are separate variables because they are declared in separate functions.

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Thank you very much, I don't know what I would do without you guys. :) –  someoneinsane Jan 28 '14 at 21:21

Because you are not calling the checkFermat method in main

Try,

public static void main(String args[]){
        int a = 8;
        int b = 4;
        int c = 10;
        int n = 3;
        checkFermat(a,b,c,n);

 }
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Update the main method :

public static void main(String args[]){
        int a = 8;
        int b = 4;
        int c = 10;
        int n = 3;
        Exercise.checkFermet(a,b,c,n);
    }
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To execute System.out.println() statement you need to call checkFermat function without calling it it will never take that statement to execute but when you will call this the main function will invoke checkformat and execute code written inside that function...

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You just call the method checkFermat like bellow

Exercise.checkFermat(a,b,c,n) or

Exercise e = new Exercise(); e.checkFermat(a,b,c,n);

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