Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a setup with two Erlang nodes on the same physical machine, and I wanna be able to send large files between the nodes.

From the symptoms I see it looks like there is only one Tcp connection between the nodes, and sending the large binary across stops all other traffic, is this the case?

And even more interesting is there a way of making the vm use several connections between the nodes?

share|improve this question
1  
How are you sending the large file? –  Nathaniel Waisbrot Jan 28 '14 at 20:39
    
I'm doing a rpc call from one node to the other with the one of the arguments being a very large binary. –  Martin Kristiansen Jan 29 '14 at 1:31
1  
Can't you use the file-system, and only send the path ? You could set up a disk shared between the VMs (use a file-system that supports sharing: GFS,OCFS2,...): been there, done that. –  Berzemus Jan 29 '14 at 7:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yeah, you only get 1 connection, according to the manual

The handshake will continue, but A is informed that B has another ongoing connection attempt that will be shut down (simultaneous connect where A's name is greater than B's name, compared literally).

Not sure what "big" means in the question, but generally speaking (and imho), it might be good to setup a separate tcp port to handle the payloads, and only use the standard erlang messages as a signaling method (to negotiate ports, setup a listener, etc), like advising there's a new incoming payload and negotiate anything needed.

Btw, there's an interesting thread on the same subject, and you might try tunning the net_* variables to see if they help with the issues.

hope it helps!

share|improve this answer

It is not recommended to send large messages between erlang nodes, http://learnyousomeerlang.com/distribunomicon Refer to "bandwidth is infinite" section, I would recommend use something else like GFS so that you don't lose the distribution feature of erlang.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.